Wild Wednesday 41/52 The Big Dipper and Bodie Chapel

Copyright ©2018 Deborah M. Zajac.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

The Big Dipper over the Chapel in Bodie State Park

I made this image back in August when several friends and I went over to the Eastern Sierras for a long week-end.  Bodie State Park stays open at night several times throughout the summer so folks can enjoy the old Ghost Town at night.

Someone had put a light in the doorway to the Chapel and lots of photographers fanned out to photograph this iconic building in Bodie myself included, but seeing The Big Dipper above the Chapel is what caught my eye. The clouds were moving in fast so I acted fast hoping to get the whole constellation in my photograph.

The red light cast you see is a light spill from someone’s red headlamp behind me.  They forgot to shut it off.  This is the only shot of the Constellation I got over the chapel due to the cloud cover.

For the History Buffs:

Bodie was a mining town in the 1800’s.  It was booming for several years after Gold was discovered there.  What started with 20 people grew to 10,000 in just over 20 years!

It’s said there were once 65 saloons in Bodie. The town teamed with families, miners, farmers, robbers, prostitutes, and of course gaming halls, and opium dens. 

In 1898 the mill burned down, and in June of 1932, the second of two major fires destroyed more of the town leaving what we see today.

There are more than 100 buildings in a state of “arrested decay” one can see while in Bodie.  Interiors remain as they were left and stocked with goods. 

In 1962 Bodie became a Register National Historic Landmark, and a State Historic Park. 

For a timeline of Bodie’s History and more click the link below.

~https://www.bodie.com/

Nikon D810| Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G| Hoodman STEEL Digital Film| PS CC 2018

more to come…

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National Train Day 2018

Copyright ©2018 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

 

Dan from No Facilities blog has been reminding Train Lovers about National Train Day for several years, and I’m so glad he’s sent those reminders otherwise I would likely forget to post the train images I’ve been saving for the day, and how special is it this year?  It’s on my Birthday! I’ve scheduled this post ahead of time because I plan to be birding, or sleeping in when it goes live. 🙂  See Dan Antion’s  Train post on his blog  here.

Last August when we were in Carson City, NV. house hunting ( after nearly a year of looking) we found a house we loved late one afternoon, and we and our Realtor planned to meet early the following morning to write up the offer.

He-Man and I rose really early, dressed, ate breakfast and headed out because I wanted to stop at the Nevada State Railroad Museum before our meeting with our Realtor.  All the months we’d been driving up and down Hwy 395 while house hunting I’d been eyeing the place and wanting to visit thinking it would be perfect for National Train Day plus I really liked the trains I was seeing at the station.

We arrived at the Museum before they were actually open for business and  am I glad we did as we were able to see the Conductors/Engineers roll out the trains from the Shed they’d be using that day, and we got to see them put each of the Motor cars on an old-fashioned manual labor turntable, and switch tracks!

They were so kind and let me take all the photos I wanted. You know,  I stayed well out of their way so not to lose that privilege.  I was good I never crossed an unwritten or written line. Phew!

I have so many images, but I’ve paired it down to a few because I’ve included some information about each Motor car which makes this a long post for me.

The Conductors chatting before work,

The Turntable with an Engineer switching the track:

 

Motor Car 22- Virginia and Truckee – For the History Buffs I gleaned this about the car from Wikipedia.

Virginia and Truckee Railway Motor Car 22, also called McKeen Motor Car 70, is a gasoline-powered railcar at the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Carson Cityin the U.S. state of Nevada. It was built for the Virginia and Truckee Railroad in 1910 by the McKeen Motor Car Company. Motor Car 22 was operated by the Virginia and Truckee until 1945, when it was sold off and became a diner until 1955. It eventually became the office and storage space for a plumbing business before it was donated to the Nevada State Railroad Museum in 1995. After a thorough study,[2] the Museum undertook a restoration of the McKeen car in 1997. The restored motor car was unveiled in 2010, a century after it was originally delivered to the Virginia and Truckee. Motor Car 22 was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005, and designated a National Historic Landmark in 2012. It is one of a few surviving McKeen railcars, and the only one that is operational.[“`https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virginia_and_Truckee_Railway_Motor_Car_22

Tucson Cornelia and Gila Bend RR N°401- For the History Buffs I gleaned this information from the Nevada State Railroad Museum’s Site

” Motor car No. 401 was built by the Edwards Motor Car Co. of Sanford, NC and put into service October 1926 by the Tucson, Cornelia & Gila Bend Railroad of Ajo, AZ. The motor car operated regularly until December 31, 1947 and was finally donated to Travel Town in Los Angeles, California.

The motor car traveled over 783,000 miles while in service, running between the copper mine at Ajo and Gila Bend, a distance of 43 miles. The car was powered by a six-cylinder White gasoline engine that was installed in November 1943, replacing the original after 17 years of service.

During 1963 the motor car was traded to Mr. Lindley Bothwell for two Los Angeles trolley cars. Acquired by Short Line Enterprises in 1975, the motor car was restored and operated in Virginia City during the 1976 season as the Washoe Zephyr No. 50. The motor car was moved to Jamestown, California and stored until it was moved to the Nevada State Railroad Museum in spring of 1988. The motor car is now owned by the museum.

The No. 50 received a new 75 HP Cummins diesel engine during the spring of 1997. The diesel engine replaced a 75 HP White gasoline engine. The White engine was installed about 1943, replacing the motorcar’s original Continental engine.

In 1999, the motor car received a new fluid drive transmission, and, before participating in Rail-fair ’99 at the California State Railroad Museum, was painted to reflect its appearance on the TC&GB.”

–Staff and Sagebrush Headlight–

Both Motor Cars at Wabuska Station waiting for passengers.

One can have a train ride from the Wabuska Station from May to December on the week-ends. I don’t know how far or where they go, but I plan to get that information and ride both cars if time allows, and visit the museum when I return. ( The museum is a short walk from the Station)

I made a time-lapse of the trains coming out of the shed and being put on the turntable from 54 of my still images.  It goes pretty fast.  If I ever start to do more videos I’ll use a dedicated video camera and hopefully do a better job in the developing process.

 

I wish I could have spent more time there, and ridden the trains, but time wasn’t on our side.  I had a blast seeing the trains come out for the day’s operation though.  I’ll be going back there. They have a Steamie (Steam Engine) too! It doesn’t run all the time. When it does I want to be there for it!

Plus 1 more! It was August and the sunflowers in front of the Museum were in bloom and at peak. I could not resist them!  🙂

I hope you liked this post for National Train Day.

The Inside Track:   Our offer was accepted. We bought the house! We’re renting it out until we can move.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm| Lexar Digital Film| Stills, and Timelapse developed in PS CC 2018

more to come…

 

 

 

 

2017 National Train Day

Copyright ©2017 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Since Dan over at No Facilities   blog reminded his followers about National Train Day last year I have been looking for trains to photograph and saving them up for future National Train Day Posts.  This year I’d like to share a little Red Engine that I’ve been saving since last September.

Some friends and I spent 3 days on Route 66.  Our base was in Barstow, California.  Not far from Barstow, CA is the Ghost town of Calico, CA.  We spent an afternoon and evening there.  For the History Buffs I’ve gleaned some information from Wikipedia about the Ghost Town, and the railroad that once operated there.

It was once a bustling mining town. “It was founded in 1881 which is when the largest silver strike was found in California. Over a 12 year span, Calico has 500 mines which produced over $20 million in silver ore. Unfortunately Calico lost it population in the mid-1890s because silver lost its value. “~Wikipedia

In the 1950’s Walter Knott bought Calico and restored it as a Living Museum. He restored the architecture to look like it did in the 1880’s.  Several of the original buildings and railroad equipment were moved to Knotts Berry Farm’s “ghost town” exhibit, but most of it remains in the town.  The Calico Ghost Town is now part of San Bernadino’s County Regional Park System.

We missed the train actually running but I did grab a shot of the little red engine.

Copyright © Deborah M. Zajac
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

“The Calico & Odessa Railroad is a 2 ft 6 in (762 mm) narrow gauge[1] heritage railroad in the ghost town of Calico, California, headquartered in Yermo, California. It was named for the town and mountain range of Calico and the nearby Odessa Canyon.[2]

It is a remake of the 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge Waterloo Mining Railroad, the original narrow gauge railroad line that hauled silver ore (and later borax) from Calico to the mills of Daggett in the 1880s, although the present-day tracks do not follow the trackbed of the original one.”~ Wikipedia

I hope everyone has a wonderful week-end!

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2017

More to come…

 

 

 

Moon Set over San Francisco

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

and I whispered…”Good-night Moon, and San Francisco sleep tight.”

Moon Set over San Francisco

Nikon Df| Nikkor 80-200mm @ 200mm| Delkin Digital Film| Tripod| Single Frame| PS CC 2017

More to come…

Thursday Doors 35/52 Conservatory of Flowers San Francisco, CA.

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

After spending 2 hours or so photographing Dahlias in the East Garden of the Conservatory of Flowers I thought I’d go up the small flight of stairs to photograph the Conservatory building, and doors before it got really crowded with Sunday park goers and tourists.

Main Entrance Doors:

Main Entrance Conservatory of Flowers

The Conservatory of Flowers has quite a history so, for the History Buffs:

The mission of the Conservatory of Flowers is to connect people and plants in a place of exceptional beauty.

“The Conservatory of Flowers has captivated guests for more than a century. This gem of Victorian architecture has a long and storied history, and is the oldest public wood-and-glass conservatory in North America. As a city, state and national historic landmark, the Conservatory remains one of the most photographed and beloved attractions in San Francisco.”~http://www.conservatoryofflowers.org/

 

Main Entrance Wide View:

Conservatory of Flowers Main Entrance

“In the mid-19th century, James Lick, a wealthy businessman and philanthropist, ordered the greenhouse for his Santa Clara estate. Unfortunately, Lick died before it was erected, and the parts remained in crates, unused for decades. The kit was put up for sale by Lick’s trustees in 1877, and purchased by a group of prominent San Franciscans who offered it to the City. The civic-minded group of donors included Leland Stanford, founder of Stanford University and Governor and Senator of California, and Charles Crocker, the industrialist responsible for much of the railroad system in the West. The Conservatory opened to the public in 1879. It was an instant sensation and quickly became the most visited location in the park.

Since its opening, the building has seen more than its share of accidents and natural disasters. In 1883 the dome was  damaged by a boiler explosion. Charles Crocker came to the rescue with $10,000 for the restoration work. During this restoration, the dome was raised by six feet and the eagle finial on top of the dome was replaced with the planet Saturn, likely a reference to the ancient Roman god of agriculture.

In 1918, the dome and adjoining room burned again, and in 1933 structural instabilities caused a 13-year closure. The most devastating damage was done by a wind storm in 1995. After a winter of storms, 20 percent of the trees in Golden Gate Park were toppled and wind patterns changed. As a result, a relatively mild windstorm severely damaged the newly exposed Conservatory. Forty percent of the glass smashed, a portion of the rare plants were lost, and the building had to be closed.

In early 1998, the Conservatory was placed on the 100 most Endangered World Monuments list by the World Monuments Fund. The National Trust for Historic Preservation adopted the Conservatory into its Save America’s Treasures program, launched as part of then First Lady Hillary Clinton’s Millennium Council projects. Publicity from these efforts eventually led to a fundraising campaign to raise the $25 million dollars for the rehabilitation, which included support from the Richard & Rhoda Goldman Fund. The Conservatory reopened in 2003.

Docents are often asked how the Conservatory faired in the earthquake of 1906. The building stood strong, without damage, and the area leading up to the building, known as Conservatory Valley, became a location of temporary tents housing San Franciscans escaping the devastation and fires throughout the city.

Since reopening in 2003, over 2 million visitors have visited the Conservatory of Flowers, including tens of thousands of school children on free educational tours and hundreds of couples marrying in the most romantic spot in San Francisco. This modern version of the Conservatory strives to connect people and plants in a way that is most meaningful for the Bay Area community and for visitors from around the world.

And the Conservatory is a place where horticultural societies, botany students, and young plant enthusiasts gather to study collections and ensure passion for living museums and conservatories will continue to flourish.

Since re-opening in 2003, the Conservatory has garnered numerous local, state and national awards.” Abridged: ~conservatoryofflowers.org

Aquatic Plants Gallery Doors: “The magical pools in the Aquatic Plants Gallery simulate the flow of a river winding through the tropics. The gallery features carnivorous pitcher plants, warm-growing orchids, and brightly painted Heliconia and Hibiscus. Giant taro leaves line the pond and the flowers of hundreds of bromeliads emerge from their water-filled buckets. A sculpture of a Victoria amazonica water lily hangs suspended in the air. The Victoria amazonica, lotus plants, and colorful water lilies grow in the ponds during the summers when water conditions are just right.”~ conservatoryofflowers.org

Conservatory of Flowers San Francisco

The Conservatory and south garden; I think this garden is gorgeous.

Conservatory of Flowers San Francisco

Standing at the top of the stairs in the image above I made this image below; the view is looking south: Sutro Tower is in the distance on Twin Peaks. On Sunday the road that this bridge is part of is closed to vehicles which makes it a bit of challenge to find parking, but it’s a boon for pedestrians, and cyclists. Isn’t that stone bridge lovely.  It’s for that bridge that I made the photo.  Pedestrians can safely cross the road by using the tunnel under the bridge during the week.  The flowers in the beds that I recognized are Foxglove and Begonia. There are other flowers, but I don’t know what they are.

South Garden Conservatory of Flowers

 

I went back to the Dahlia garden after making this last image.  I’ll share more of those images soon.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 24-70mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2015.5

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

http://www.conservatoryofflowers.org/