Thursday Doors-Upside Down House

Copyright ©2022 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 

PLEASE DO NOT USE MY IMAGES WITHOUT EXPRESSED WRITTEN PERMISSION.

This house is located in Lee Vining, California. I discovered it in April this year while in the area camping.

The house may be upside down, but the door isn’t.

The sign in front of the house reads,

Upside Down House

Created by Nellie Bly O’Bryan (1893-1984)

A remarkable resident of the Mono Basin, Nellie Bly O’Bryan built this famous tourist attraction in 1956.  It was inspired by a children’s tale, “Upside Down Land” ( a story), which Nellie recalled after seeing a tipped-over miner’s cabin.  It was originally located along Hwy 395 south of the Mono Inn. After her death, the house fell into disrepair until it was moved here in 2000.

Years before coming to Mono County in 1939, Nellie became Hollywood’s first female projectionist and appeared in several of Charlie Chaplin’s silent films.

The information on the right of the photo of Nellie reads, “Nellie as the masseuse in “A woman of Paris 1923“.

Souvenir cards and more information about Nellie Bly O’Bryan are inside the museum.

She sounds like a very interesting woman doesn’t she?! The museum was closed at the time I was there. I don’t know if the door to the house is ever open, but I’ll check when there again.

This post is part of Dan Antion’s Thursday Doors Click on the link and be taken to his blog where you’ll see all the entrees for this week’s Thursday Doors.

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more to come…

Whatever Weds. North American Elk

Copyright ©2022 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

One of the highlights we had while visiting Rocky Mountain National Park last October were the North American Elk herds. The surprising thing is just how BIG they are. They stand 5 feet tall at the shoulder, and weigh several hundred pounds. The females are half their size. Only the males have antlers which they shed each winter. Their antler can grow up to an inch a day!

One morning while in Estes Park I saw a Bull laying in the shade with his harem and made my over to get some images of them.

The bull …

North American Elk Bull

He had about dozen females (called cows) in his harem. Here he is with some of them just chillin.

Bull Elk with some of his harem

Here’s an image of a bull and some of his harem we saw the night before just after the sun went behind the mountains while in Rocky Mountain National Park.

North American Elk Bull with Harem

The rutting season begins in October so the bulls were on high alert keeping a close eye on their harems and keeping them close by.

Fun Fact-

Free roaming elk have a lifespan of 10-13 years in the wild.

https://www.nps.gov/romo/learn/nature/elk.htm

We really enjoyed seeing these wonderful animals while we in the park. They really do enrich the visit.

Fuji X-T3| Fujinon 100-400mm| PS CC 23.1.1

more to come

Thursday Doors- The Sherlock Holmes

Copyright ©2021 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Back in 2019 the day after Christmas He-Man, myself, and Big Baby Boy headed to London for a little British Christmas and New Year’s fun.

Early one morning while on our way to…I’ve forgotten which museum we were heading to I spotted this pub and stopped for a quick photo. While the doors are open I’m not really sure if it was open or not. Don’t you love the flower baskets of greenery?

December 29, 2019

I did a quick online search to see if there was any information about the pub and found this,

“”The Sherlock Holmes pub is a traditional English pub serving pints and pub food. As well as a bar and restaurant, the pub has a secret – a complete recreation of Holmes and Watson’s study and sitting room with a large collection of objects and photographs related to the characters from the books and adaptations. The collection was put together for the Festival of Great Britain and moved to this permanent home at the Sherlock Holmes pub in 1957.” ~https://www.visitlondon.com/things-to-do/place/48927-sherlock-holmes-pub”.

I wish we had gone back this route and stopped in for a drink and lunch! I would have loved to see that interior now that I know what it is.

This post is part of Thursday Doors which is hosted by Dan Antion. His blog is No Facilities. Click here to get to his blog to see many other doors from all over the world that other door lovers have shared this week.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 24-120mm| PS CC 23.0.0

more to come…

Wordless Weds.- Autumn on the Fall River

Copyright ©2021 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Fall River, Estes Park, CO.2021

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Thursday Doors: Lord John Russell Pub

Copyright ©2020 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Whist in London over the Holidays I passed this pub on the way to the British Museum and had to stop to get a photo of the lovely Blue Door. I love the hanging sphere plants and that shade of blue. Lord John Russell

I did a quick search to see how long the pub has been there and found it’s been there a LONG TIME! In 1856 a John Russell was in the postal directory at this address.

Here’s the link to the London pub wiki that shares the pub’s history.

To see more doors from around the world visit our favorite Doorlican Norm here!

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more to come…

 

Thurs. Doors- Stationary

Copyright ©2019 Deborah M. Zajac ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Here’s a door from my trip in September to New Orleans.  I spied this in the French Quarter. I love the cheery yellow with the white trim and green bicycle parked in the perfect spot with a potted plant all making a lovely composition I thought.

Stationary

 

This post is part of Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors.

Head over to his blog to see all the other doors that were shared from around the world.

Nikon D810| Nikkor 24-120mm| Lexar Digital Film| PS CC 21.0.1

more to come…

Thursday Doors- Bowers Mansion

Copyright ©2019 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Twice in October, I went out to Washoe City to tour the grounds of Bowers Mansion. Washoe City is between Carson City, and Reno, NV.  My goal was Fall Color, and Doors.  These images are about a week apart.

The story behind the mansion is one of Boom and Bust during the Comstock Lode years.

Let’s walk around the grounds, shall we?

For the History Buffs- we go to WikiPedia for this information:

The land originally was purchased in 1856 by Eilley and her second husband Alex Cowan, who returned to Utah a year later with other Mormon settlers. Eilley secured a divorce and moved to Gold Hill where she ran a boarding house and took in washing. Some miners, unable to pay for lodging and laundry with cash, gave Eilley Orrum pieces of their mining claims in payment. Thus she acquired the mining claim which, together with that belonging to her third husband Sandy, became the source of their fortune.

 

Bowers Mansion

Bowers Mansion

The mansion was the fulfillment of Eilley’s dreams of prestige and respectability. The mansion, designed by J. Neely Johnson, a builder and ex-governor of California, combined Georgian Revival and Italianate architectural styles. It was modeled after a design conceived by Eilley based on her recollection of elegant buildings in her native Scotland. Indeed, the Bowers employed stonecutters from Scotland for the construction of their new home, which eventually cost $300,000 to build,[2] an exorbitant sum in the 1860s. Eilley and Sandy toured Europe from 1861 to 1863, purchasing furniturestatuary, paintings and other adornments for their home. Unfortunately, during one of these trips abroad, Eilley Bowers’s only child, a daughter named Pearl, died.

Under the Boughs at Bower's Mansion

Following the death of Sandy Bowers in 1868, Eilley fell on hard financial times. She generated income by renting out rooms in the mansion and hosting parties and picnics on the grounds. The mansion hosted a ball for the women’s suffrage movement and was the location of the annual Miner’s Ball. The period of 1873–75 was the height of the mansion’s popularity.[3]

However, this was not enough to overcome Eilley’s debts and she finally lost her home to foreclosure in 1876. The mansion was abandoned by the time Henry Riter acquired it and operated it as a resort until 1946.

Front Door and Entry to Bower's MansionBowers Mansion

Today:

The building is currently owned and operated by the Washoe County Parks Department. Some 500 Nevada families have donated period furniture housed in the mansion. The park blends the historical site with recreational facilities such as a spring-fed swimming pool, picnic areas, and a playground. Tours of the mansion are given in summer and autumn.

~https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bowers_Mansion

Bowers Mansion VIsitors Center

Bowers Mansion

Copyright © Deborah M. Zajac ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

The Mansion tours were closed both days that I went to photograph the Mansion.  I plan to go back and tour the inside one day.

This post is part of Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors.

Head over to his blog for his Thursday Doors, and see all the other doors people have posted this week.

Nikon D810| Nikkor 24-120mm| Lexar Digital Film| PS CC

more to come…