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Copyright ©2017 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Nikon Df| Nikkor 35mm f/1.8G| SanDisk Digital Film| PS CC 2018

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Copyright ©2017 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Since Dan over at No Facilities   blog reminded his followers about National Train Day last year I have been looking for trains to photograph and saving them up for future National Train Day Posts.  This year I’d like to share a little Red Engine that I’ve been saving since last September.

Some friends and I spent 3 days on Route 66.  Our base was in Barstow, California.  Not far from Barstow, CA is the Ghost town of Calico, CA.  We spent an afternoon and evening there.  For the History Buffs I’ve gleaned some information from Wikipedia about the Ghost Town, and the railroad that once operated there.

It was once a bustling mining town. “It was founded in 1881 which is when the largest silver strike was found in California. Over a 12 year span, Calico has 500 mines which produced over $20 million in silver ore. Unfortunately Calico lost it population in the mid-1890s because silver lost its value. “~Wikipedia

In the 1950’s Walter Knott bought Calico and restored it as a Living Museum. He restored the architecture to look like it did in the 1880’s.  Several of the original buildings and railroad equipment were moved to Knotts Berry Farm’s “ghost town” exhibit, but most of it remains in the town.  The Calico Ghost Town is now part of San Bernadino’s County Regional Park System.

We missed the train actually running but I did grab a shot of the little red engine.

Copyright © Deborah M. Zajac
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

“The Calico & Odessa Railroad is a 2 ft 6 in (762 mm) narrow gauge[1] heritage railroad in the ghost town of Calico, California, headquartered in Yermo, California. It was named for the town and mountain range of Calico and the nearby Odessa Canyon.[2]

It is a remake of the 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge Waterloo Mining Railroad, the original narrow gauge railroad line that hauled silver ore (and later borax) from Calico to the mills of Daggett in the 1880s, although the present-day tracks do not follow the trackbed of the original one.”~ Wikipedia

I hope everyone has a wonderful week-end!

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2017

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Copyright ©2017 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Copyright © 2017 Deborah M. Zajac ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

At the end of March He-Man and I had our 36th Wedding Anniversary, but we kept it pretty QT since it fell on a week-day. We were anticipating our get-away to Pismo Beach this past week-end (April 1st & 2nd) to celebrate us.

He-Man booked a room for us right on the cliffs with a balcony with a partial view of the ocean and pool area.   The image above is the sunset Saturday evening from our balcony on the 3rd floor.  I loved this view.

The hotel we stayed in is the Shore Cliff Hotel in room 315. When we opened the door and walked down the small hallway to the main sleeping area we were surprised and delighted to find the bed covered in rose pedals (faux) and a tray loaded with two wine glasses, a pair of Swans made from Towels (towel art), a bottle of Sparkling Cider, and a card wishing us a Happy Anniversary!  Isn’t that lovely!

Shore Cliff Hotel Rm 315 Anniversary Week-end

The swans towel art and rose pedal theme was even in the bathroom.  It had double sinks- I loved that! I wish my own bathroom had room for double sinks, but really don’t want one more sink to clean. 🙂

Shore Cliff Hotel Bathroom Rm 315

I’ll show you the little kitchen area, and entertainment areas of the room too.

Rm315 Shore Cliff Hotel Pismo Beach

Entertainment Center Rm 315 Shore Cliff Hotel

The view from our balcony; late afternoon

View from Balcony of Rm 315

and a welcome party of one came to our room shortly after our arrival.  He flew up to the balcony and stayed for awhile then he flew down for a swim and bath in the pool after leaving our balcony. (I’m saying he but don’t know for sure.)   🙂

Seagull balcony Rm 315 Shore Cliff Hotel

I think that might be the Mrs. watching to make sure he gets behind his wings.  🙂

Seagull in Pool Shore Cliff Hotel_IMG_6672

We went to dinner next door where I found a great door which I’m saving for a future Thursday Doors post.

We had a lovely week-end, and enjoyed our stay at Shore Cliff Hotel and love this part of California’s coastline.

Top image: Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm| Delkin Digital Film|

Hotel Images: iPhone 7 Plus

All developed in PS CC 2017

I’m behind on emails and blogs again. I hope to catch up this week!

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Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

About 6 weeks ago I spent a week-end touring a small part of U.S. Route 66 with friends.

painted-road-sign-rte-66_dmz6233

One of the places we stopped along the Route to check out was the WigWam Motel in Rialto, California.

N°16 WigWam Motel

Several of the Tipis’ were empty and had their doors open so I inquired if I could take a peek inside of one; the proprietor graciously allowed me to take a tour of one. The shower stall is behind the entryway door. There was no room for it in the bathroom proper.

N°16 WigWam Motel Room Interior

There are 19 Tipis’ in this Village, a swimming pool,

WigWam Motel

…and several vintage cars on the property. I couldn’t resist making an image of the old WigWam Motel Van.

WigWam Motel Vintage Van

For the History Buffs:

“The Wigwam Motels, also known as the “Wigwam Villages“, is a motel chain in the United Statesbuilt during the 1930s and 1940s. The rooms are built in the form of tipis, mistakenly referred to as wigwams.[3] It originally had seven different locations: two locations in Kentucky and one each in Alabama, Florida, Arizona, Louisiana, and California.

They are very distinctive historic landmarks. Two of the three surviving motels are located on historic U.S. Route 66: in Holbrook, Arizona, and on the city boundary between Rialto and San Bernardino, California. All three of the surviving motels are listed on the National Register of Historic Places: the Wigwam Motel in Cave City, Kentucky, was listed in 1988 under the official designation of Wigwam Village #2; the Wigwam Motel in Arizona was listed as Wigwam Village #6 in 2002; and the Wigwam Motel in California was listed in 2012 as Wigwam Village #7.

Village #7: Rialto/San Bernardino, California, Wigwam Village No. 7

Frank Redford built this complex for himself in 1947–49 and not as a franchise. The address of the motel is Rialto, California, but the motel is physically located in San Bernardino. It is on the boundary between the two cities on historic Route 66, with an address of 2728 East Foothill Boulevard, Rialto, California.[11]

Unlike the one arch of wigwams in other surviving villages, Village #7 has a double row of wigwam guest rooms. They total 19 in number, as well as a base for what seems to be another never-completed wigwam in the back of the property. A central building is currently used as an office, with a lobby that is open 24 hours a day. There is also a swimming pool, a large grass front and palm trees surround the property.

The property had become very run down and rooms were rented by the hour, aggravated by a sign advertising “Do it in a Tee Pee” that is still on site in the back.[12] The complex underwent renovation, for which the National Historic Route 66 Federation awarded the Cyrus Avery Award in 2005.[13][14] Attention to detail was the main focus during renovation, as the wigwams lost their zigzag pattern.

Since 2012, the motel has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[11][15]

“U.S. Route 66 (US 66 or Route 66), also known as the Will Rogers Highway, the Main Street of America or the Mother Road, was one of the original highways within the U.S. Highway System. US 66 was established on November 11, 1926, with road signs erected the following year.[4] The highway, which became one of the most famous roads in America, originally ran from Chicago, Illinois, through Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona before ending at Santa Monica, California, covering a total of 2,448 miles (3,940 km).[5] It was recognized in popular culture by both the hit song “(Get Your Kicks on) Route 66” and the Route 66 television show in the 1960s.

US 66 served as a major path for those who migrated west, especially during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, and the road supported the economies of the communities through which it passed. People doing business along the route became prosperous due to the growing popularity of the highway, and those same people later fought to keep the highway alive in the face of the growing threat of being bypassed by the new Interstate Highway System.

US 66 underwent many improvements and realignments over its lifetime, and it was officially removed from the United States Highway System in 1985,[2] after it had been replaced in its entirety by segments of the Interstate Highway System. Portions of the road that passed through Illinois, Missouri, New Mexico, and Arizona have been designated a National Scenic Byway of the name “Historic Route 66“, which is returning to some maps.[6][7] Several states have adopted significant bypassed sections of the former US 66 into the state road network as State Route 66.”

420px-map_of_us_66-svg

History and Map Image credit: WikiPedia.com

We had a fun time and crammed a lot in over the course of the week-end.  I have more images from Calico Ghost Town, and Barstow’s train station that I’m saving for future posts.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G & 28-105mm lenses| Delkin Digital Film| Hand-held and Tripod

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

On the first night of the Fall Color week-end in the Eastern Sierras my friends and I had very little time to go far to photograph sunset, and it was looking like the sunset might be a pretty one because there were good clouds in the sky.

I knew a spot with a good view of the Minarets that had been a good sunset spot for me in the past, and it was close by so that’s where we headed.

To our delight it was a gorgeous sunset.

Minarets Sunset

The Minarets are the jagged, saw-tooth peaks in the mountains in the heart of Ansel Adams Wilderness. They’re located in a part of the Sierras called Ritter Range. The highest peaks in the Minarets are Clyde at 12, 261ft,  Eichorn at 12,255ft, and Michael at 12,240ft. There are 17 minarets that have been named. They were named after the first mountain climbers to climb the peaks, but in some cases the second mountain climbers name was used to avoid duplication.

For the History Buffs:

While both Ritter and Banner were climbed in the 19th century, the Minarets did not see activity until the 1920’s. Charles Michael, a Yosemite postmaster, along with his wife Enid were the first to record an ascent in 1923 of Michael Minaret. Over the next ten years most of the remaining minarets were climbed by various parties involving many of the famous climbers of the era, including Norman Clyde, Walter Starr, Jules Eichorn and Glen Dawson, among others. In 1948, Dyer Minaret was the last (and most difficult) of the group to be climbed. In 1933, Walter Starr’s son went missing on a solo trip to the area. An intense search ensued, culminating in the discovery of his fallen body high on the slopes of Michael Minaret. His body was interred where it lay, and still rests there to this day.

Today, there are dozens of routes among the many pinnacles, but the reputation for poor rock quality keeps most enthusiasts away. The picturesque lakes that lie on the approach routes are very popular with backpackers, but only a small portion of the visitors venture to the summits of the Minarets where solitude and a grand sense of adventure are certain to be found.” ~http://www.summitpost.org/minarets/247994

Nikon Df| Nikkor 17-35mm| Delkin Digital Film| Singh-Ray Reverse Grad| Tripod

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Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

For this week’s Thursday Doors post I’m sharing more doors from Legoland California. The displays are really, really good.

There’s a section in the park with iconic buildings; some of which one must take a river cruise to see, but this display of the United States Capitol Building located in Washington D.C. wasn’t part of the cruise.  There are quite a few doors on it, but I have no close ups of the front doors due to the columns.

Legoland United States Capitol Building

Here’s close up of the Marching Band’s Drum Major though. Both my children were in their school bands all through their school years beginning in 4th grade so I’m rather fond of marching bands. 🙂  Baby Girl was a  flutist, and Big Baby Boy was a drummer.

All the while they were growing up I was  trying to play piano with weekly lessons. Just like I had them doing.  There was for many years music, and a beat in our house.  I miss it! I do hope #1 Grandson picks up an instrument.  He plays my piano…without trying he picks out notes, chords and riffs! I have hope that he has the gift that skipped me.  Drum Major Marching Band LegoLand CA

That’s the Washington Monument you see sticking up behind the Capitol Bldg.

I have no idea how many Lego bricks it took to build this monument/display, but I know it took many, many hours to complete.  I was in awe looking at all the displays.  Really, they are amazing.

Around the back side of the Capitol Bldg. is a replica of Georgetown.

Another fact about me I don’t think I’ve shared on this blog is that I’m a huge fan of Americana art.  Geez, tonight I’m really opening up! Must be the Full Sturgeon Moon. 🙂

I LOVE Charles Wysocki, and Linda Nelson Stocks who are Americana artists.  I’ve crossed stitched a Wysocki Autumn Americana Village which took me nearly  9 months to complete.  I had it framed.  Before our remodel last year it hung over my mantle. It’s still packed…like most of my art at the moment. I feel really blessed to own one of Linda Nelson Stocks pieces. It is currently hanging over my mantle. It’s called the Village of Brewster.

I have 3 more seasons of Wysocki cross stitch pieces to complete; winter is started, but I have no idea when or if I’ll ever complete them.  Fall I completed b/c it’s my favorite season.

Anyway, when I saw this colonial red house with white door with black and gray trim I oohed, and aaahhed. Oh, who am I kidding. I SWOONED! Then I took a photo for Thursday Doors. 🙂   I want this house with street lamps. and gate sold as a kit. I’d buy it, put it together with some sort of Loctite glue so it wouldn’t come apart, and I’d put it in my family room. Probably on top of my Entertainment Center where my Victorian Dollhouse resides. 🙂  I love and collect miniatures too. FWIW:  I have stopped collecting Dolls, Teacup sets, and Teapots. I ran out of room! TMI? Okay, I know I’m a chatter duck! 🙂

Copyright © Deborah M. Zajac ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I really like the gate on the left of the house too. The little blue door down the street was a bonus.  🙂 I’m sorry I have no idea how many Lego bricks it took to build this part of Georgetown either.

Warning! I have one or two more post of doors from Legoland California!

BTW: If this week’s post looks funky I apologize! I’m trying to get my images to display a bit larger. This theme is behaving differently the last month or so; my images are a good deal  smaller than they used to be. I may end up changing themes! I hope you hang in there with me through this process! Believe me I am not looking forward to changing! It will be hard for me too!

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

 

More to come…

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Saturday I spent late morning until early afternoon at sea Whale Watching outside of Monterey, CA. We sailed about 12 miles off shore to the Monterey Submarine Canyon where there were quite a number of Humpback Whales, Gray Whales, and a Blue Whale feeding on Krill, and other little fishes that were abundant on Saturday.

“The Monterey Submarine Canyon is quite large…an undersea Grand Canyon. It’s 470 kilometers (292 miles) long and approximately 12 kilometers (39 ft) at its widest point with a maximum rim to floor relief of 1,700 meters (5,577feet).”  ~Simon Sanctuary

It’s was quite exciting seeing the Whales! I didn’t see a Breach this time out, but saw lots of Spouting, or Blowing.

Humpback Whale Spouting

It was overcast, windy, and a bit choppy out at sea the whole time. The Sun only peeked out a couple of times.

I saw some Fluking when the whales  are going to dive down as much as 50 meters.

Humpback Whale Fluking

Humpback Whale Fluking

Once they reach the depth they want they begin to slowly rise by spiraling up to the surface often in teams creating a Bubble Net.  The purpose of the bubble is to congregate the Krill and prey and force them to the surface. The Krill and fish see the bubbles as a net and feeling trapped they stay in the center of the  Bubble Net. The Whales come up with an explosion of air with their mouths wide open eating all they can.

Here are two images of  a fin  of a Humpback Whale when it breaks the surface while they’re under the surface spinning.

Humpback Whale Spouting w Flipper showing

Humpback Whale Flipper;

The Humpback often get under that Bubble Net and Lunge up with their mouths gaping open scooping up the prey. Here you see at least 3 working as a team.

Humpback Whale Lunge Feeding

I see four working together here.

Humpback Whales Lunge Feeding

Humpback Whale Lunge feeding.

Humpback Whale Lunge Feeding

Humpback Whales spend the winter in the warm waters near Costa Rica and Hawaii. Humpbacks, including mothers with calves travel thousands of miles to feast on krill, and schooling fish in the Monterey Bay while they migrate north to their feeding waters in Alaska.  They grow to be 45ft to 62ft (14-19 meters) long!

I missed quite a few good photo ops b/c for the first time in my life I got sea sick. It’s NOT FUN! I will go again but, I’m taking medicine before hand.

The images are not converted to Black & White. It was so gray out that they look black and white.

Nikon D700| Nikkor 80-200mm| Lexar Digital Film| Hand-held| Developed in PS CC 2015.5

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