Thurs. Doors-The Little Church of the Crossroads

Copyright ©2022 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. DO NOT USE MY IMAGES WITHOUT EXPRESSED WRITTEN PERMISSION!

He-Man and I are beginning to explore a bit more of our new home state of Nevada this time we spent a couple of days in Elko County exploring Lamoille Canyon in the Ruby Mountains. While on the scenic highway I spied this beautiful little church and had to stop for a photo or two.

Lamoille Presbyterian Church

From the church’s website found here they say the congregation had its first church service in Lamoille in 1872, and in 1890 the Organization of the First Presbyterian Church of Lamoille was established.

In 1905 they layed the first cornerstone for the building.

Since then it has gone through some changes and even closed for a time because of a decline in population and non use. It came back though and has been restored and had a second addition added in 1983, and in 2005 the community celebrated its 100th anniversary!

Closer look at the Door
Lamoille Presbyterian Church

This post is part of Thursday Doors a weekly challenge group. You can find many other door posts over on our host’s site found here.https://nofacilities.com/2022/09/29/big-e-2022/

Fuji X-T3| Fujinon 16-80mm| PS CC 23.5.0

more to come…

Whatever Weds. Giant Swallowtail Butterfly

Copyright ©2022 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. DO NOT USE MY IMAGES WITHOUT EXPRESSED WRITTEN PERMISSION!

While in Il, USA I spied a new to me Butterfly at one of the reserves I visited.

Giant Swallowtail Butterfly

The Giant Swallowtail is the largest Butterfly of all of North America, but Female Tiger Swallowtails are nearly the same size.

They live mostly in the Eastern US and it typically stays in wooded areas and residential gardens.

This one looks like an adult and a bit tattered, but I was thrilled to see it!

Fuji X-T3| Fujinon 100-400mm| PS CC 23.4.1

FYI- I’ll be taking a break from the blog until mid August. I’ll have limited internet so I’ll catch up with you then. Be safe, and well until then!

more to come…

Whatever Weds. This and That July 2022

Copyright ©2022 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 

PLEASE DO NOT USE MY IMAGES WITHOUT EXPRESSED WRITTEN PERMISSION.

Hello! It feels like I’ve been MIA for awhile. We were in the Chicago Region for my Son’s wedding and extended our stay a few days to do a little sightseeing and birding.

They had both a professional wedding photographer and videographer for the day. Here’s one image of Big Baby Boy and the Dark Haired Beauty just after the wedding. May I present the Newlyweds!

#1 Grandson was the Ringbearer and what a handsome and stylish lad he was.

The whole wedding party were handsome and beautiful, and we’re so happy to been able to travel to be a part of their Big Day.

The following day I spent the morning birding around the Orland Park area. It’s a lovely area with lots of ponds, wetlands, and green!

I have to give a huge shout out and thank you to Pat from the Thorn Creek Audubon Society I reached out to them before the trip and he was very generous telling me about a few places to go to do some birding. I picked up a couple of bird lifers, and a dragonfly which I’ll share first. While waiting for one of the reserves to open He-Man and I stopped by a little fishing pond where I spied this beauty.

I think this is an Erythemis simplicicollis- Eastern Pondhawk. Don’t you love that color green and it’s common name? I do!

Photograph

The evening we got home I started feeling pretty achy and stuffed up, and the next day I tested positive for Covid and the following day He-Man did too. Sigh. Today I am finally feeling like I’m getting over it. I’m still weak and tire easily but I woke up feeling more like myself than I have in a week!

I hope this finds you all well and having a great week!

Dragonfly- Fuji X-T-3| Fuji 100-400mm| PS CC 23.4.1

more to come…

Thursday Doors-Upside Down House

Copyright ©2022 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 

PLEASE DO NOT USE MY IMAGES WITHOUT EXPRESSED WRITTEN PERMISSION.

This house is located in Lee Vining, California. I discovered it in April this year while in the area camping.

The house may be upside down, but the door isn’t.

The sign in front of the house reads,

Upside Down House

Created by Nellie Bly O’Bryan (1893-1984)

A remarkable resident of the Mono Basin, Nellie Bly O’Bryan built this famous tourist attraction in 1956.  It was inspired by a children’s tale, “Upside Down Land” ( a story), which Nellie recalled after seeing a tipped-over miner’s cabin.  It was originally located along Hwy 395 south of the Mono Inn. After her death, the house fell into disrepair until it was moved here in 2000.

Years before coming to Mono County in 1939, Nellie became Hollywood’s first female projectionist and appeared in several of Charlie Chaplin’s silent films.

The information on the right of the photo of Nellie reads, “Nellie as the masseuse in “A woman of Paris 1923“.

Souvenir cards and more information about Nellie Bly O’Bryan are inside the museum.

She sounds like a very interesting woman doesn’t she?! The museum was closed at the time I was there. I don’t know if the door to the house is ever open, but I’ll check when there again.

This post is part of Dan Antion’s Thursday Doors Click on the link and be taken to his blog where you’ll see all the entrees for this week’s Thursday Doors.

iPhone 7Plus| PS CC 23.3.2

more to come…

One Line Weds. Oops!

Copyright ©2022 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. DO NOT USE MY IMAGES WITHOUT EXPRESSED WRITTEN PERMISSION!

While on my early morning walk on Monday as I was passing a house where there was some noise of remodeling or construction going on I suddenly heard,

“Oh no! I just cut my cord.”

Table Saw

That was a tough way to start the day and week! I hope your week is going better than that guys started.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 50mm f/1.8g| Photo taken in 2015 while our old house was being remodeled. |PS CC 23.2.2

This post is part of Linda G. Hill’s weekly One-Liner series. Head on over to view other One-liners posted today. https://lindaghill.com/2022/06/08/one-liner-wednesday-life-renews/

more to come…

Friday’s Feathered Friends-Red-Tail Hawk Chick

Copyright ©2022 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. DO NOT USE MY IMAGES WITHOUT EXPRESSED WRITTEN PERMISSION!

The Red-Tail Hawk is back using the same nest as last year for this year’s breeding season. Yipee!

On the 15th while on my walk I think I spied a little head so when I got home I grabbed my camera and went back out to take photos of the nest and sure enough there was a chick in the nest and Mom too.

Red-Tail Hawk and sleepy chick

It wasn’t long before Mom took flight to stretch her wings. She flew into a tree across the way a bit to keep watch and once in awhile she called out letting the chick know she was near…I think. I kept waiting hoping the chick would sit up and it paid off.

Red-tail Hawk Chick

Look how fuzzy and soft it looks! 2 weeks later look how big it is and there’s less fuzz and more brown.

Red-tail Hawk Chick

The tree has leafed out quite a bit too making it a bit more difficult to see the chick. This is heavily cropped as well.

I’ll keep checking in on it and hopefully, I won’t miss the fledging like I did last year.

Fun Facts-gleaned from allaboutbirds.org

  • The Red-tailed Hawk has a thrilling, raspy scream that sounds exactly like a raptor should sound. At least, that’s what Hollywood directors seem to think. Whenever a hawk or eagle appears onscreen, no matter what species, the shrill cry on the soundtrack is almost always a Red-tailed Hawk.
  • Birds are amazingly adapted for life in the air. The Red-tailed Hawk is one of the largest birds you’ll see in North America, yet even the biggest females weigh in at only about 3 pounds. A similar-sized small dog might weigh 10 times that.
  • The “Harlan’s Hawk” breeds in Alaska and northwestern Canada, and winters on the southern Great Plains. This very dark form of the Red-tailed Hawk has a marbled white, brown, and gray tail instead of a red one. It’s so distinctive that it was once considered a separate species, until ornithologists discovered many individuals that were intermediate between Harlan’s and more typical Red-tailed Hawks.
  • Courting Red-tailed Hawks put on a display in which they soar in wide circles at a great height. The male dives steeply, then shoots up again at an angle nearly as steep. After several of these swoops he approaches the female from above, extends his legs, and touches her briefly. Sometimes, the pair grab onto one other, clasp talons, and plummet in spirals toward the ground before pulling away.
  • Red-tailed Hawks have been seen hunting as a pair, guarding opposite sides of the same tree to catch tree squirrels.
  • The oldest known wild Red-tailed Hawk was at least 30 years, 8 months old when it was found in Michigan in 2011, the same state where it had been banded in 1981.

I hope you all have a lovely week-end!

Fuji X-T3| Fuji 100-400mm lens| PS CC 23.2.2

more to come…

Friday’s Feathered Friends-Allen’s Hummingbird Male

Copyright ©2022 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. DO NOT USE MY IMAGES WITHOUT EXPRESSED WRITTEN PERMISSION!

While visiting Big Baby Boy and The Dark Haired Beauty earlier this month I went out early one morning to photograph the flowers that were in bloom and saw to my delight an Allen’s Hummingbird male flitting around and landing on a Bottlebrush Bush.

Going for a sip
A bit miffed and ready to fly
ByeBye!

I haven’t seen these or hardly any Hummers where I live now so this really was a treat seeing this one. Aren’t his colors wonderful.

Fun Facts: gleaned from allaboutbirds.org

  • Male and female Allen’s Hummingbirds use different habitats during the breeding season. The male sets up a territory overseeing open areas of coastal scrub or chaparral, where he perches conspicuously on exposed branches. The female visits these areas, but after mating she heads into thickets or forests to build a nest and raise the young.
  • Allen’s Hummingbirds breed in a narrow strip of habitat along coastal Oregon and California. But within their tiny range two subspecies occur. One (Selasphorus sasin sasin) migrates to a small area in Mexico for the winter while the other (S. s. sedentarius) stays put in southern California year-round.
  • The Allen’s Hummingbird is a remarkably early migrant compared with most North American birds. Northbound birds may depart their wintering grounds as early as December, arriving on their breeding grounds as early as January when winter rains produce an abundance of flowers.
  • Like other birds, Allen’s Hummingbirds use their feet to help control their body temperature. When it’s cold outside they tuck their feet up against their bellies while flying, but when temperatures soar, they let their feet dangle to cool down.
  • The oldest recorded Allen’s Hummingbird was at least 5 years 11 months old when she was captured and rereleased in California during banding operations in 2009. She was banded in the same state in 2004.~allaboutbirds.org

It’s going to be blustery and chilly here this week-end with maybe some snow and rain in the mountains so, I’ll be near home this week-end. I hope you have something fun planned!

Fuji X-T3| Fuji 100-400mm Lens| PS CC 23.2.2

more to come…