Thursday Doors Nº302

Copyright ©2019 Deborah M. Zajac.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

A friend came up to meet me for a meet-up over the week-end and after a long day of hiking, and elevation gain she spent the night in our guest room. We both were a bit wiped out after 8 miles of hiking and several hundred feet of elevation gain so, we stuck closer to my area rather than go hiking again on Sunday.  I’m still suffering from elevation sickness when going up, and so was she.  I hope this isn’t going to be an issue for my whole life!

My left hip was really achy too and has been for a year or more. Anna, my friend suggested P/T for it. That got me thinking about stretching so I dug out my Yoga book and Monday I added 4 stretches to my morning routine that I have left out for a couple of years. After 3 days of incorporating the hip stretches my hip feels so much better! I love yoga stretches!

Anyway,  I digress. One of the things she wanted to do was see the area so we did a photo walk of downtown Carson City’s Civic Center. Carson City is the closest “biggish” town to me now.

Thankfully, Carson City has kept some of its old west charms and St Charles Hotel/The Fox BrewPub is a Historic building located across the street from the Capitol Building that is one of those charming buildings that has been preserved and is still in use today.  Carson City is the Capitol of Nevada for those out of the country who may not know that.

Copyright © 2019 Deborah M. Zajac
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

For the History Buffs, I gleaned some information about the Hotel/BrewPub from Carsonpedia. I’ve linked their page below.

“The hotel was originally built as two separate buildings. The northern, three-story, section was started on April 1, 1862, and was named the St. Charles Hotel. Construction on the southern two-story building started one month later, and it opened as the Muller Hotel. The builders were George W. Remington and Albert Muller, and they partnered with Dan Plitt who owned a bakery on the corner where the hotel was to be built. The hotel was first advertised in the October 2, 1862 edition of the Silver Age newspaper. It was called “the most desirable and commodious first-class house in Carson,” and “the pleasantest resort in Carson and where everything kept by the bar is the best quality.” ~http://carsonpedia.com/St._Charles_Hotel

Isn’t it interesting that no one of those who were invested in or partnered in the venture was named Charles?  Who was Charles? I want to know. Was it a neutral name that all could agree to so no one was bigger or more acknowledged than the other?

The Hotel has had some successful years and quite a few failed years and has had 8 name changes since its construction in 1862 and a few owners.

I love how literate the people were back then. No one says commodious anymore and it’s a terrific and descriptive word.

It is said that Mark Twain likely had a drink there since he lived in Carson City for a spell. I wonder if that was after his friends saved him from a pistol duel that he was challenged to in Virginia City where he lived for a couple of years? It’s said his closest friends knew he was a really bad shot and wanted him to live and continue writing, so they helped him get of town in the dead of night to avoid the duel.  I’ll have to research that.  I do know that he and his brother traveled by an Overland Coach to Carson City from St Joseph, Mo. in 1861 for $150.00! That was a princely sum in those days! I’m gobsmacked that they paid so much then! Are you?  He wrote about his journey to Carson City in his book Roughing It. I bought it and have been slowing reading it.  It’s really good! FYI. There’s a really great Mark Twain Impersonator in Virginia City. One day I hope to find him alone without some modern person speaking to him to get a photo of him. He’s really great, but there’s been a modern person speaking with him both times I’ve come across him, and I waited, and waited, and waited, Good Lord these people can talk! I have given up both times and moved on after 5 minutes. I just don’t have the patience to wait that long for a “people” shot.  I’ll wait hours for a landscape or night sky shot, but not a people shot. My heart just isn’t in it.  Hat Tip to those who will wait for that shot! You are amazing!

I digress again! History has so many twists and turns that I tend to get caught up in one or another and go off on tangents for awhile. I eventually come back to the point but…I love history. That probably should have been my major, but it wasn’t.  It was my son’s though ( Big Baby Boy)…so the beat goes on. 😀 I’m talking way too much, aren’t I…

Today in 2019 it is the Historic St. Charles Hotel/Fox BrewPub

If you’re interested in reading its history click the link to read it. It’s a short read.   http://carsonpedia.com/St._Charles_Hotel

The door is small from this angle, but I loved the whole building with its red bricks, door, white trim, and balcony. I didn’t get closer for a close up of the door and now that I’m typing this up I thought, ” DOH! We should have had lunch there!”  We didn’t.  We went to a new to me but a new favorite of mine called Jimmy Johns.  I love their Tuna on Thick Wheat Bread. Do you have a Jimmy Johns where you live? We didn’t in Silicon Valley.  I need to snap a photo of the sandwich too! I’m usually so hungry by the time I get to the restaurant or deli that I inhale my meal and forget to get a photo of it. Sigh…I’m not a good foodie photog.

I think if the topic fit I should have written this for Stream of Consciousness Saturday cause I’m digressing all over the place, but… it’s not. So, a little bitty view of a red door on very cool Historic building with a whole lot of verbiage is what I’m bringing today to Thursday Doors.

This is part of Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors.  If you have a door or two to share head on over to his blog and join in the fun or just head over and see the doors others have shared from all over the world. Just follow his directions at the end of his Thursday door post.

CarNikon D810| Nikkor 24-120mm| Lexar Digital Film| PS CC 20

more to come…

 

 

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Moon Set over San Francisco

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

and I whispered…”Good-night Moon, and San Francisco sleep tight.”

Moon Set over San Francisco

Nikon Df| Nikkor 80-200mm @ 200mm| Delkin Digital Film| Tripod| Single Frame| PS CC 2017

More to come…

Thursday Doors 19/52 Ainsley House

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

For my Thursday Doors post this week I visited Ainsley House located a couple of miles from me in Campbell, CA.  A little history about Campbell, and the house.

“Campbell, CA is  small city located in Santa Clara County, and Silicon Valley. It’s bordered on the east, and north by San Jose, on the south by Los Gatos, and on the west by a small portion of Saratoga, and San Jose (which is where I live).

Campbell was founded by Benjamin Campbell, after whom the city was named. He came to California in 1846 with his father, William Campbell. William started a sawmill in Saratoga and surveyed the cities of San Jose and Santa Clara. In 1851, Benjamin bought 160 acres (0.65 km2) in southern Santa Clara Valley and cultivated hay and grain on it. This area later became Campbell’s historical downtown core.” ~ Wiki-pedia

This area was largely farm land and orchards in the 1800’s.

” In 1886 John Colpitts Ainsley, and Englishman, immigrated to California and made his fortune here in the canning of fresh fruit,  which was almost exclusively exported to England. In 1925, he and his wife Alcinda, built this retirement home in the English Tudor Revival style.

The house is both a symbol of his success and a time capsule of the 1920’s. The house and most of the furnishings were donated to the City of Campbell by the Ainsley’s granddaughters, Geraldine Lloyd Hicks and Georgene Lloyd Bowen.”~ The Campbell Museum FoundationAinsley House Front Door

The house was built in 1925. The house originally sat in the southwest of their 83 acre orchard on the corner of Hamilton and Johnson (now Bascom) Avenues. The historic home was moved to its present location at 300 Grant Street in Downtown Campbell in 1990.

Since its relocation it has been restored to its original 1920’s appearance inside and out.

Today the Ainsley House is a city run historic house museum open to the public.

The Ainsley House Campbell, CA

The carriage house is now the Morgan Gallery. It offers free exhibits and videos detailing the history of Campbell.

Ainsley House Carriage House Morgan Gallery

Since the museum/house was closed I wasn’t able to get in to see the inside or the backyard, but the Ainsley Volunteer Garden was open so, I popped in there and took a several images of the lovely flowers growing there.

Sunflower

Are these Button Willows? They’re lovely! Tall, and they spread out. They’d be too much for my yard I’m sorry to say.

Button Willows

 

Macro Photography

I don’t know what this flower is either, but it has a lovely cone like center. Is it a Dahlia?

Ainsley House Garden

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm micro lens| Tripod & Hand-held| Delkin Digital Film

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links, or add your own.

More to come…

 

 

 

Historic Alviso, CA: Thursday Doors 4/52

Copyright © 2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Last Sunday while I was out birding I knew I needed to get my Door image sorted out for Thursday Doors this week, and as I drove through Alviso to get to the Wildlife Refuge I thought,

” There’s some old and probably interesting doors in Alviso! I’ll take a spin through the old Cannery area to see what I find.”

For the History Buffs:

Alviso, CA.  is the northern boundary of San Jose, CA, and the Southern boundary of San Francisco Bay.  It once was an independent city, but in 1968 the town voted to consolidate with the city of San Jose, CA. Alviso has no US Mail delivery service. Residents have to go to the Post Office to collect their mail.

Alviso is 13 ft below sea level and had severe flooding in the 80’s, and again in the 90’s.  There was 10ft of water in parts of Alviso. The Guadalupe River, and Coyote Creek both end in Alviso and empty into the Bay via Alviso Slough, and Mud Slough.  Many homes and businesses were ruined in those floods.

There are few businesses in Alviso today.  It’s largely residential, and marsh land.

Speaking of marshland: Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Alviso is part of 6 other wildlife refuges in the Bay Area. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, the first urban National Wildlife Refuge established in the United States, is dedicated to preserving and enhancing wildlife habitat, protecting migratory birds, protecting threatened and endangered species, and providing opportunities for wildlife-oriented recreation and nature study for the surrounding communities.

Now onto the Doors! 🙂

Here’s the front door of the Tilden-Laine House.

Tilden Laine House Front Door

Here’s how the whole house looks:

It’s style is called Italianate Victorian.   The home dates back to the early 1900’s. According to Wiki-Pedia it’s still owned by the Laines.

 

Tilden-Laine House Alviso CA

Right next door is what was once The Laine Store. The Tilden family ran the store from 1865-1912. In the 1920’s it became a Chinese Gambling hall.

The Laine Store Alviso CA 2016

I read that the flood watermark was over the top of the doors! On the Wiki page I linked to below are two images of the Laine store one from 1981, and the other from 2007.  It’s pretty interesting to see how much the building has aged in that time. The Laine Store is a Registered Historical Landmark.

After the San Francisco earthquake and fire in 1909 the Precita Canning Company moved to Alviso and reorganized and changed their name to the Bay Side Canning Company. It hasn’t been used since 1936. The city is letting the buildings decay.

Bayside Canning Co Doors

The last time I was there back in 2010 or 11, I was shooting portraits I had the model right up near the wall. Now there’s fencing all around the property.  The murals tell the story of Alviso’s history.

Bayside Canning CO

This building below with the two doors I just liked. I can’t find any information about it, but the street is residential though this building doesn’t look like it was a house. It looks like it’s being used for storage today.

Doors White Building Alviso

There are more doors and buildings I would like to photograph here! For more information and history see the link below.

~ history and info gleaned from Wikipedia  Pedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alviso,_San_Jose,_California#History

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors. Click here to see all the doors shared this week.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm | Hoodman STEEL Ultra High Speed Digital Film| Hand-held| PS CC 2015

 

MM2-1 “Whenever you wear your hat, your day will be special”~Margo Nickel

Copyright ©2015 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I’m going to participate in Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness 52 project this year. I’m a little apprehensive, and unsure if I’ll be able to complete all 52 weeks, and produce good work, but I’m going to try!

Yesterday a photographer friend of mine Dali, a colleague of his, and myself went up north to San Rafael, CAto photograph the last Frank Lloyd Wright commissioned building before heading to San Francisco for the Chinese New Year Parade.

The building is the Marin County Civic Center building. I was shooting the escalator when this woman came down the stairs so, I quickly recomposed to make this image.

Need to work on: I wish I had slowed the shutter speed down just a touch slower though. I wanted her to have a bit more motion blur showing movement. I’ll have to practice more street photography to get better at ICM and people blur.

"Whenever you wear a hat, your day will be special."~Margo Nicke

I have a few more images from the Marin County Civic Center Building, and lots from the Chinese New Year Parade I’ll be sharing soon.

Nikon Df| AF-S Nikkor 17-35mm| Hoodman STEEL Ultra Fast Speed Digital Film| Hand-held| developed in CS6 and Nik Suite’s Silver Efex Pro 2

More to come…

5-Day Black and White Photography Challenge

Copyright © 2014 Deborah M. Zajac. All Rights Reserved.

A friend of mine Alex Baranda  challenged me to a 5-Day Black and White Photography challenge. I’ll be posting a black and white image each day for 5 days, and I’m supposed to challenge another photographer to do the same. Right now I’m thinking I’ll skip that part and just work on the challenge. For me it’s outside my box. I rarely process images in Black & White. I love color, and I haven’t found a recipe that says, ” That’s Deborah Zajac’s work.” yet.

I’m excited about this challenge. Hopefully I’ll grow as a photographer and learn something new too.

Thanks Alex for the push!

Here’s my image for Day 1- This is from my archives. The Legion of Honor in San Francisco, CA. Taken in July 2011.

Nikon D300s| AF-S Nikkor 17-35mm f/2.8| Tripod | Developed in CS 6

History of the Palace of the Legion of Honor is here.

More to come…

The Legion of Honor San Francisco CA