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Copyright ©2017 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Since Dan over at No Facilities   blog reminded his followers about National Train Day last year I have been looking for trains to photograph and saving them up for future National Train Day Posts.  This year I’d like to share a little Red Engine that I’ve been saving since last September.

Some friends and I spent 3 days on Route 66.  Our base was in Barstow, California.  Not far from Barstow, CA is the Ghost town of Calico, CA.  We spent an afternoon and evening there.  For the History Buffs I’ve gleaned some information from Wikipedia about the Ghost Town, and the railroad that once operated there.

It was once a bustling mining town. “It was founded in 1881 which is when the largest silver strike was found in California. Over a 12 year span, Calico has 500 mines which produced over $20 million in silver ore. Unfortunately Calico lost it population in the mid-1890s because silver lost its value. “~Wikipedia

In the 1950’s Walter Knott bought Calico and restored it as a Living Museum. He restored the architecture to look like it did in the 1880’s.  Several of the original buildings and railroad equipment were moved to Knotts Berry Farm’s “ghost town” exhibit, but most of it remains in the town.  The Calico Ghost Town is now part of San Bernadino’s County Regional Park System.

We missed the train actually running but I did grab a shot of the little red engine.

Copyright © Deborah M. Zajac
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

“The Calico & Odessa Railroad is a 2 ft 6 in (762 mm) narrow gauge[1] heritage railroad in the ghost town of Calico, California, headquartered in Yermo, California. It was named for the town and mountain range of Calico and the nearby Odessa Canyon.[2]

It is a remake of the 3 ft (914 mm) narrow gauge Waterloo Mining Railroad, the original narrow gauge railroad line that hauled silver ore (and later borax) from Calico to the mills of Daggett in the 1880s, although the present-day tracks do not follow the trackbed of the original one.”~ Wikipedia

I hope everyone has a wonderful week-end!

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2017

More to come…

 

 

 

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Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

For this week’s Thursday Doors post I’m sharing more doors from Legoland California. The displays are really, really good.

There’s a section in the park with iconic buildings; some of which one must take a river cruise to see, but this display of the United States Capitol Building located in Washington D.C. wasn’t part of the cruise.  There are quite a few doors on it, but I have no close ups of the front doors due to the columns.

Legoland United States Capitol Building

Here’s close up of the Marching Band’s Drum Major though. Both my children were in their school bands all through their school years beginning in 4th grade so I’m rather fond of marching bands. 🙂  Baby Girl was a  flutist, and Big Baby Boy was a drummer.

All the while they were growing up I was  trying to play piano with weekly lessons. Just like I had them doing.  There was for many years music, and a beat in our house.  I miss it! I do hope #1 Grandson picks up an instrument.  He plays my piano…without trying he picks out notes, chords and riffs! I have hope that he has the gift that skipped me.  Drum Major Marching Band LegoLand CA

That’s the Washington Monument you see sticking up behind the Capitol Bldg.

I have no idea how many Lego bricks it took to build this monument/display, but I know it took many, many hours to complete.  I was in awe looking at all the displays.  Really, they are amazing.

Around the back side of the Capitol Bldg. is a replica of Georgetown.

Another fact about me I don’t think I’ve shared on this blog is that I’m a huge fan of Americana art.  Geez, tonight I’m really opening up! Must be the Full Sturgeon Moon. 🙂

I LOVE Charles Wysocki, and Linda Nelson Stocks who are Americana artists.  I’ve crossed stitched a Wysocki Autumn Americana Village which took me nearly  9 months to complete.  I had it framed.  Before our remodel last year it hung over my mantle. It’s still packed…like most of my art at the moment. I feel really blessed to own one of Linda Nelson Stocks pieces. It is currently hanging over my mantle. It’s called the Village of Brewster.

I have 3 more seasons of Wysocki cross stitch pieces to complete; winter is started, but I have no idea when or if I’ll ever complete them.  Fall I completed b/c it’s my favorite season.

Anyway, when I saw this colonial red house with white door with black and gray trim I oohed, and aaahhed. Oh, who am I kidding. I SWOONED! Then I took a photo for Thursday Doors. 🙂   I want this house with street lamps. and gate sold as a kit. I’d buy it, put it together with some sort of Loctite glue so it wouldn’t come apart, and I’d put it in my family room. Probably on top of my Entertainment Center where my Victorian Dollhouse resides. 🙂  I love and collect miniatures too. FWIW:  I have stopped collecting Dolls, Teacup sets, and Teapots. I ran out of room! TMI? Okay, I know I’m a chatter duck! 🙂

Copyright © Deborah M. Zajac ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I really like the gate on the left of the house too. The little blue door down the street was a bonus.  🙂 I’m sorry I have no idea how many Lego bricks it took to build this part of Georgetown either.

Warning! I have one or two more post of doors from Legoland California!

BTW: If this week’s post looks funky I apologize! I’m trying to get my images to display a bit larger. This theme is behaving differently the last month or so; my images are a good deal  smaller than they used to be. I may end up changing themes! I hope you hang in there with me through this process! Believe me I am not looking forward to changing! It will be hard for me too!

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

 

More to come…

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Saturday I spent late morning until early afternoon at sea Whale Watching outside of Monterey, CA. We sailed about 12 miles off shore to the Monterey Submarine Canyon where there were quite a number of Humpback Whales, Gray Whales, and a Blue Whale feeding on Krill, and other little fishes that were abundant on Saturday.

“The Monterey Submarine Canyon is quite large…an undersea Grand Canyon. It’s 470 kilometers (292 miles) long and approximately 12 kilometers (39 ft) at its widest point with a maximum rim to floor relief of 1,700 meters (5,577feet).”  ~Simon Sanctuary

It’s was quite exciting seeing the Whales! I didn’t see a Breach this time out, but saw lots of Spouting, or Blowing.

Humpback Whale Spouting

It was overcast, windy, and a bit choppy out at sea the whole time. The Sun only peeked out a couple of times.

I saw some Fluking when the whales  are going to dive down as much as 50 meters.

Humpback Whale Fluking

Humpback Whale Fluking

Once they reach the depth they want they begin to slowly rise by spiraling up to the surface often in teams creating a Bubble Net.  The purpose of the bubble is to congregate the Krill and prey and force them to the surface. The Krill and fish see the bubbles as a net and feeling trapped they stay in the center of the  Bubble Net. The Whales come up with an explosion of air with their mouths wide open eating all they can.

Here are two images of  a fin  of a Humpback Whale when it breaks the surface while they’re under the surface spinning.

Humpback Whale Spouting w Flipper showing

Humpback Whale Flipper;

The Humpback often get under that Bubble Net and Lunge up with their mouths gaping open scooping up the prey. Here you see at least 3 working as a team.

Humpback Whale Lunge Feeding

I see four working together here.

Humpback Whales Lunge Feeding

Humpback Whale Lunge feeding.

Humpback Whale Lunge Feeding

Humpback Whales spend the winter in the warm waters near Costa Rica and Hawaii. Humpbacks, including mothers with calves travel thousands of miles to feast on krill, and schooling fish in the Monterey Bay while they migrate north to their feeding waters in Alaska.  They grow to be 45ft to 62ft (14-19 meters) long!

I missed quite a few good photo ops b/c for the first time in my life I got sea sick. It’s NOT FUN! I will go again but, I’m taking medicine before hand.

The images are not converted to Black & White. It was so gray out that they look black and white.

Nikon D700| Nikkor 80-200mm| Lexar Digital Film| Hand-held| Developed in PS CC 2015.5

More to come…

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

My friends and I arrived in Lakeport, CA a day before our Grebe boating trip because, we had a 3 hour drive to get there, and a 5:30 a.m. boarding time Sunday morning.

We spent Saturday afternoon birding in Clear Lake State park, then went to dinner at a local Thai place, and finally we wrapped up the day in Library Park on the lake front for sunset. Image here.  If you’re a foodie and in the area, and like/love Thai food; hit me up for this place. It’s great!

Before setting up for sunset I spotted a door I really wanted to photograph. It turned out to be a Carnegie Library Door!

Door

The Lakeport Library Committee submitted Carnegie’s ” Schedule of Questions” hoping they would qualify for a grant. The Carnegie Corp. approved an $8,000.00 grant in 1914. Construction started in 1917 and  was completed in 1918.

Carnegie Lakeport Library

The lake was actually all the way up here prior to dredging for Yolo County’s Power Plant which built Clear Lake Dam also in 1914.  White & Co., investment bankers in New York financed YWP’s dredging in Clear Lake and filling in the area along Lakeport’s waterfront. Owners of the new land deeded their property to Lakeport for a city park.

The library and building might have been lost to a fire in 1953 had not librarian Gertrude Benson smelled the smoke and called the Fire Department! It was an electrical fire which started in the attic. The fire department was able to extinguish the fire before major damage occurred.

In 1986 the county library moved from the cramped Carnegie to a new library on High Street in Lakeport.

In 2008 the Carnegie Library was entered into the National Parks Service’s National Register of Historic Places.

Just after the lights came on at the Gazebo, and the colors in the sky faded T, and Dali were hailing me from my reverie to come see it. They know me so well. They knew I’d want a photograph of that. 🙂

Library Park Gazebo Lakeport CA

In 2014 the building was vacant. The city contracted with Garavaglia Architecture, Inc. to prepare a Feasibility Study to see what needed to be done to preserve and save the building, and put to it other use.

The plaque/sign beside the door reads: City of Lakeport

CARNEGIE LIBRARY

I can’t make out the small font below that- then

LAKEPORT REDEVLOPMENT AGENGY

Redevelopment

Housing

Economic Development

CITY ATTORNEY

I could not find any current information about the building beyond 2014 in my surfing the Internet. I don’t know if it’s in use now or still vacant. It looks quite old and in need of some TLC en mon avis.

I love the lamps, which were in the design tastes of Carnegie’s secretary James Bertram. They symbolized enlightenment.

“Every Library was simple yet formal and entered through a prominent doorway, nearly always accessed by a staircase which symbolized a person’s elevation by learning.” ~Wiki-pedia.org

I really  love how people think of that stuff ahead of time and incorporate it in their plans during the design/planning stage.  Me. I never think of stuff like this ahead of time. It’s always a day, or month later!

Carnegie was a Scottish-American business man and philanthropist.  There were 2,509 Carnegie libraries built between 1883, and 1929. 1,689 were built in the United States of America. ~ Wiki-pedia

The History Buffs can find a pretty thorough history of the Carnegie Lakeport Library’s History here.

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links, or add your own.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 20mm f/1.8| Delkin Digital Film| Tripod| PS CC 2015

More to come…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

While in Manhattan my sisters and I took a Twilight/City Lights cruise around the harbor on the Clipper City Tall Ship.

Manhattan Skyline

We sailed for two hours around the harbor seeing the Statue of Liberty, Ellis Island,  Governor’s Island, and of  course Manhattan’s skyline. One World Observatory Tower stands gleaming with the last rays of the day’s sun shining on it, and the city beneath it.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2015 & On 1 Photo 10

More to come…

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

In W.R. Hearst’s heyday  of the 20’s and 30’s he would invite many of Hollywood elite to “come to the Ranch and ride with me.”  Some of the famous who stayed there are:

Winston Churchill, Howard Hughes, Charlie Chaplin, Joan Crawford, Clark Gable, Greta Garbo, Cary Grant, Mary Pickford, David Niven, and Jean Harlow but, many more influential and famous people stayed there as well.

Hearst had rules that must be followed or you’d be asked to leave. Our guide said if you were asked to leave you weren’t invited back!

The Rules: “No drunkenness, no bad language or off-color jokes and, above all, no sexual intercourse between unmarried couples.”

Unmarried couples had to stay in a room with two beds. Each room had a bathroom.

On our tour of the upper floors we saw several of these lavish guest rooms.

Guest Rm II Door

Guest Room Door-Hearst Castle_Photography

Guest Room door detail

Hearst Castle Guest Room Door detail-Photography

Guest Room II- A dinner suit laid out for a guest on the bed as it would have been in the 20’s and 30’s.  Hearst did serve beer, and wine our guide told us, but it wasn’t allowed in the guest rooms, and neither was food.

Hearst Castle Guest Room_Photography

Guest Room Door III

Hearst Castle-Guest Room Door

Guest Room III- these rooms were off a narrow hallway on the north side of the Castle. We climbed a very narrow circular staircase to reach them. The windows of the guest rooms faced East.  The artwork, and lamps, and furnishings were gorgeous.

Hearst Castle Guest Room

The separate sleeping beds for unmarried couples was a bit hypocritical of Hearst considering he lived in the Castle with his long time Mistress Hollywood actress, and ex-showgirl Marion Davies.

This door was in the North Bell Tower .

Door in Heart Castle's Bell Tower

Nikon Df| Nikkor 24-70mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2015| Hand-held

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links, or add your own.

More to come…

 

 

 

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I spent the week-end in Morro Bay, CA. and of course couldn’t help but notice a door or two. 🙂

The first door I encountered that I loved were the built-in sliding blind doors that covered our sliding glass doors in our room at Embarcadero Inn. I liked them so much I’m going to have them put on our sliding glass door when we replace the 5 doors we didn’t do in the remodel last year. That will be after we finish the new retaining walls, and planting in the backyard which is happening this week.

Anyway, here’s what those blinds look like. We had a view of the Harbor, but not Morro Rock.

Rm 211 Embarcadero Inn, Morro Bay CA.

Nº 495- I liked the waves etched in the glass on this door.

Nº495 Door Morro Bay CA

Nº 830- Sun~n~Buns Bakery’s side door +1- there were delicious odors wafting from this door. It was with great will-power that we walked by it without going in. We were saving our appetites for dinner.

Nº830 Sun~n~Buns Bakery

Nº 1185- The Portal Window and flag drew me to this door, the menu drew us in for dinner. Great American Fish Co.  We both had the Mesquite Grilled Talipia. It was so tender, and good I ate the whole filet!

Nº1185 Great American Fish Co. Morro Bay

I couldn’t pass up the doors on two boats docked in the harbor. Could you? 🙂

This first one I liked how weathered the door was, and I saw an abstract image in it. I wish I had my longer lens with me just then!

Fishing boat, Morro Bay, CA

Papagallo II the yacht’s door struct me as being clean, classic, and the oak gave me the impression that it was sturdy and strong.  Is she a yacht? I don’t know boats very well, but I know what I like! 🙂

Papagallo II, Morro Bay, CA

There were two unusual  homes that I came across while keeping an eye out for doors, although one is only a partial door I hope Norm, and the Door Purist forgive me for this entry, but I couldn’t resist.

The Windmill House: Was the home of Gladys Walton the silent film star. She added on the Windmill late in her life.  She also built a Lighthouse house in Morro Bay, but I missed that one! She died in Morro Bay at the age of 90. You see, I could only see part of the upper door on the balcony, and the back door due to the fence.

The Windmill House-Morro Bay, CA

Nº 1270- The Pueblo House- I thought this house was really out of place here at the coast, but perhaps not being California. While I was taking photos of the doors, and house the owner or resident came home. Thankfully, he was really nice and thought it was cool that I was taking photos of his doors. PHEW!

Nº1270 The Pueblo House, Morro Bay, CA

Nº1270 image 2, front of the house

Nº 1270 The Pueblo House, Morro Bay, CA

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links, or add your own.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 24-70mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2015

More to come…

 

 

 

 

 

 

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