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Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

While over in Minden and Gardnerville, Nevada last Saturday we had a bit of time to kill so I cruised around looking for what else? DOORS!:)

The Steeple or Tower caught my eye of Trinity Lutheran Church before I knew what it was so He-Man and I made bee-line to the church.

Trinity Lutheran Church

This may have been the front door at one time, but I think they’re using a door on the East side now.  There were quite a few cars in the parking lot on that side, and I did see a large glass door, but didn’t venture over there thinking there was something going on…possibly a wedding. I erred on the side of CHICKEN, and stayed on the north side of the building.

I really like the brick work in the arch entryway, and blond doors. I’m also a huge fan of brass kick plates.

Interesting facts/History:

The church was established in 1877. The first Trinity Lutheran Church in Carson Valley.

The first service in the nearly completed first building was in 1895.  The official dedication ceremony for the newly built church was in 1897.

In 1899 a 1,020 pound church bell that was cast in France was installed.  I’m guessing the tower holds the bell. Sadly, I didn’t hear it while there, but later that afternoon I heard a church bell, and wondered if this was what I was hearing.

In 1918 the use of German was suspended until after World War I.

In 1930 they selected their first building committee, but the Great Depression in 1931 contributed to the collapse of the  first building effort.

1941 World War II begins. Many of their members enter the service 3 of which will not make it back.

Kenneth Storke was killed on the island of Luzon in 1945. His Grandfather, Henry Marquat donated the site for a new church also in 1945.

The following year they selected their second building committee, and in early Fall 1953 they held their last service in the old building.

In the fall of 1953 the new church was dedicated.

~trinitygv.com

Door to Trinity Lutheran Church

A side door closer look

Side Door Trinity Lutheran Church

and two plaques that are on the front brick work near the front doors.

Trinity Luthern Church Dedication Plaque

Building Age Plaque Trinity Lutheran Church

The doors are simple yet elegant, and building is beautiful I think.

I’ll be going back to the area before summer is over we’re looking at houses there, and I will stop by the church to see if I can get a look at the East and South sides of the building…and with any luck maybe a peek inside too. One can hope!

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

 

 

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Torch Lily has several common names- Red Hot Poker,  and Tritoma, but its real name is Kniphofia uvaria.  It gets it’s name Red Hot Poker from the shape of the blossom, and Torch Lily from the blossom, and the shape of its leaves which are similar to the Lily.  They get to be quite tall, and can bloom at different times of the growing season. I made this image in the Spring while out birding.

It’s looks amazing against a green or dark background.

Flower Photography

It’s a non-native plant to California. It originated in Cape Provence of South Africa, but it isn’t uncommon here.

When reading about this plant I discovered it’s become invasive in south-eastern Australia and they consider it an environmental weed.  I guess it spreads easily damaging native and sensitive ecosystems.  It may come to that here too, but it’s pretty, and a show stopper.

Nikon D700| Nikkor 200-500mm| Hoodman Digital Film| PS CC 2015.5

Heads Up– Adobe PS CC had a Bridge, and Adobe Camera Raw Update today.  If you have PS CC just open your  cloud thingy and Bob’s your Uncle!  I will say since moving to the subscription service Updates are easy.

More to come…

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

The July Full Moon is called the “Buck Moon” in North America because male Deer are usually beginning to grow their antlers again in July.
The July Full Moon also has two other names. The Hay Moon; July is when Farmers begin storing their Hay, and the Thunder Moon because of the many thunder storms in the month of July.

I made this image in Santa Cruz, CA. The Moon looks large because it’s close to the horizon. Being on the coast there was a lot of moisture/atmosphere in the air, and the fog was slowly rolling in from the southeast so, the Moon looks a bit diffused.

The Moon was so pretty in the pink reflected light of the Belt of Venus. The pink part of the sky after sunset is called the Belt of Venus. It’s a phenomenon that happens after sunset and before sunrise. “The dark band of the Earth’s shadow at dusk and dawn often has a light pink arch above it, known as the Belt of Venus. It extends about 10-20 degrees up from the horizon, acting as a boundary between the shadow and the sky. The effect is due to the reddened sunlight being backscattered in the atmosphere, which produces the rosy glow.”~http://www.howitworksdaily.com/what-is-the-belt-of-venus/

Full Buck Moon

as the Moon rose higher it began to turn more Golden.

Full Buck Moon Twilight

Then it was time to head home.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 200-500mm| Delkin Digital Film| Tripod

More to come…

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I went over the hill to Santa Cruz, CA. yesterday evening to photograph the rising Full Moon- the Buck Moon.  I noticed this door getting out of the car. The light hit the glass just right.

It reminds me of an Abalone shell’s interior.  The wood on this door looks so supple and soft doesn’t it.  I want to touch that door to see if it’s really wood!:)

N°119 Santa Cruz

I’ll post the Buck Moon image soon!

Lumix FZ200| Lexar Professional Digital Film| Hand-held

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Saturday I spent late morning until early afternoon at sea Whale Watching outside of Monterey, CA. We sailed about 12 miles off shore to the Monterey Submarine Canyon where there were quite a number of Humpback Whales, Gray Whales, and a Blue Whale feeding on Krill, and other little fishes that were abundant on Saturday.

“The Monterey Submarine Canyon is quite large…an undersea Grand Canyon. It’s 470 kilometers (292 miles) long and approximately 12 kilometers (39 ft) at its widest point with a maximum rim to floor relief of 1,700 meters (5,577feet).”  ~Simon Sanctuary

It’s was quite exciting seeing the Whales! I didn’t see a Breach this time out, but saw lots of Spouting, or Blowing.

Humpback Whale Spouting

It was overcast, windy, and a bit choppy out at sea the whole time. The Sun only peeked out a couple of times.

I saw some Fluking when the whales  are going to dive down as much as 50 meters.

Humpback Whale Fluking

Humpback Whale Fluking

Once they reach the depth they want they begin to slowly rise by spiraling up to the surface often in teams creating a Bubble Net.  The purpose of the bubble is to congregate the Krill and prey and force them to the surface. The Krill and fish see the bubbles as a net and feeling trapped they stay in the center of the  Bubble Net. The Whales come up with an explosion of air with their mouths wide open eating all they can.

Here are two images of  a fin  of a Humpback Whale when it breaks the surface while they’re under the surface spinning.

Humpback Whale Spouting w Flipper showing

Humpback Whale Flipper;

The Humpback often get under that Bubble Net and Lunge up with their mouths gaping open scooping up the prey. Here you see at least 3 working as a team.

Humpback Whale Lunge Feeding

I see four working together here.

Humpback Whales Lunge Feeding

Humpback Whale Lunge feeding.

Humpback Whale Lunge Feeding

Humpback Whales spend the winter in the warm waters near Costa Rica and Hawaii. Humpbacks, including mothers with calves travel thousands of miles to feast on krill, and schooling fish in the Monterey Bay while they migrate north to their feeding waters in Alaska.  They grow to be 45ft to 62ft (14-19 meters) long!

I missed quite a few good photo ops b/c for the first time in my life I got sea sick. It’s NOT FUN! I will go again but, I’m taking medicine before hand.

The images are not converted to Black & White. It was so gray out that they look black and white.

Nikon D700| Nikkor 80-200mm| Lexar Digital Film| Hand-held| Developed in PS CC 2015.5

More to come…

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I had pretty good luck spotting insects while hiking in Point Reyes National Seashore last week-end.  I saw Butterflies, Beetles, and Grubs. Here’s a sampler.:)

I’m pretty sure this is a Skipper, but I can’t find anything that looks exactly like it in my books, or online so, don’t know what it is.  I found it in Point Reyes National Seashore last week-end; July 9,2016.  Anyone know what it is and what it is called?

Unknown Skipper or Butterfly?

Other insects I found while exploring different areas of the park were:

A ladybug, one of several I saw…

Copyright ©2016  Deborah M. Zajac
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

a green and black beetle called a Spotted Cucumber Beetle,

Spotted Cucumber Beetle

who was pretty hungry,

Spotted Cumcumber Bettle

…a Common Buckeye Butterfly

Common Buckeye Butterfly

…and a grub or grasshopper served a la carte to a White Crown Sparrow that is banded. It’s the first time I’ve ever seen a banded sparrow.

Banded White Crown Sparrow

Nikon Df w/28-105mm lens and Delkin Digital Film, and  Lumix FZ200 w/ Lexar Digital Film- Hand-held

More to come…

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Last week-end while in Point Reyes National Seashore I went out to Pierce Point Ranch which is where the road ends heading north in the park.   I was planning to hike out to see the herd of Tule Elk, but it was so foggy reports from hikers returning from the trail said they’d not seen or heard the Elk.  So, instead of hiking I stayed at the ranch and took photographs of some of the buildings and doors.

For the History Buffs:

The Ranch was constructed by Solomon Pierce in the 1860’s. It was the most successful “butter rancho” in Point Reyes Township.  

In the 1880’s the ranch was leased to a series of tenants, and in the mid 1930’s it was sold to the McClure family which operated it’s Grade B dairy until the about 1945, when dairy ranching ceased after 90 years. 

The complex includes the 1869 and earlier sections of the two-story main house, the tank house, school, woodshed, carpenter shop, blacksmith shop, dairy, horse barn, slaughter house, hay barn, hog sheds,  and pens.  It represents the most extensive surviving historic complex in the Point Reyes National Seashore. 

The Pierce Point Ranch on Tomales Point ceased operations in 1973. Three years later, Congress authorized creation of the wilderness area incorporating that ranch as habitat for the reintroduction of Tule Elk. Beginning in 1980, NPS invested in the rehabilitation of the ranch core, citing it as the best example of a nineteenth century west Marin dairy ranch. Pierce Point Ranch was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985, and was subsequently opened to the public as an interpretive site.“~http://wikimapia.org/100600/Pierce-Point-Ranch

Dairy/Long Barn Doors:

Long Barn Doors Pierce Point Ranch

The Dairy/Long Barn- It was so foggy the sky was white so, I converted this image to Black and White.

Long Barn Pierce Ranch

another image of the Dairy and shed with a couple more doors.

Dairy Barn Pierce Point Ranch

This might be the school house,

Pierce Point Ranch Point Reyes National Seashore

Closer look of door of possible school,

Door to building at Pierce Point Ranch

A closer look at that door knob, and pad lock,

Door knob and Best Lock Pierce Point Ranch

Here’s an image of a male Tule Elk that I took here back in 2012. Can you see the velvet hanging off his antlers around his face? He’s scratching it off and polishing his antlers.  I saw him on Bachelors Hill.

Tule Elk Male

The Bachelor’s; There were quite a few of them that year.  They were also pretty far away. My lens was stretched beyond its limits that day too.

Tule Elk Males

The only wildlife I saw while at the ranch Saturday was an Alligator Lizard sunning itself.

 

Alligator Lizard

It was a great day despite the fog and no Elk.

Nikon Df w/ Nikkor 28-105mm| Delkin Digital Film, and Lumix FZ200, Lexar Digital Film,

The 2012 images were made with the Nikon D700 w/Nikkor 70-300mm VR, SanDisk Digital Film

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

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