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Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

This is the most elegant and prettiest garage door I think I’ve ever seen.  I loved the arched windows above it, and the bougainvillea vine growing around it.

N°2538

Image made while on a walk-about in San Francisco.

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Look at that eye!  Really not liking me and my camera clicking away.  They are characters Northern Mockingbirds.

They mimic other birds. There’s one in my neighborhood that mimics a car alarm.  Really!

They’re fiercely  territorial.  I’ve witnessed a Northern Mockingbird dive-bombing a cat trying to nap in the sun more times than I care to count. The cat just flinched and went back to its nap. REALLY? Why didn’t the cat strike out and eat that bird? Cats eat birds! The Northern Mockingbird must have more power than a cat!

Northern Mockingbird

When this one grew tired of my clicking it flew away. Leaving me nothing to photograph. Sigh.  It’s a cunning bird for sure!

Nikon D700| Nikkor 200-500mm| Lexar Professional Digital Film| PS CC 2017

More to come…

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

At the beginning of the month I met two friends in Phoenix, AZ for a long week-end to photograph Sedona and a little bit of South Rim Grand Canyon.  I was the first to arrive but, my friends weren’t due in for 3+ hours. So, with a lot of time on my hands I picked up the rental car then headed toward downtown and some lunch.

I got lucky and found a Subway and Starbucks right next door to each other so headed there. After lunch I thought I’d go deeper into downtown and see if I spotted anything interesting.

Well, I didn’t get all the way into town when these doors caught my eye.

Central United Methodist Church

I made a right turn then circled around the block looking for a place to park.  I found parking in the church parking lot.

A woman who worked at the church came out and I asked for permission to photograph the doors, and she said, “sure!”. Then let me know it was also a school which was in session so don’t go in the classrooms.  No worries there! I assured her. I wasn’t interested in that or the kids just the doors.🙂

The inner courtyard is lovely.

Courtyard CU Methodist Church

and there’s a large grassy area. That’s a classroom wing.Classroom Wing and Grass area Inner Courtyard

looking at the Bell Tower from the courtyard,

Central United Methodist Church

It was about this time that a man came walking thorough the courtyard with his lunch and asked what I was doing, so as I was I telling him all about Thursday Doors, and my quest for doors another woman came out of the office so, he introduced me and told her what I was doing. I gave them both my “calling card”, and invited them to look me up on the blog and see what I photograph and look at other Thursday Door posts.  The woman asked me if I wanted to see the inside of the Chapel?  She didn’t need to ask me twice!

The Pulpit, Organ pipes, and Stained Glass Window,

Central United Methodist Church Interior

What the Reverend sees, well mostly🙂

Interior Central United Methodist Church

the inside of the front doors,

Interior Central Ave Doors

In the hall near the door is a stone plaque from the original church building.

Central Methodist Plaque

FOR THE HISTORY BUFFS:

“After the 1870 Los Angeles Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, a lone circuit rider headed east across the hot and barren Mohave Desert, then into the Sonoran Desert … his destination, the few isolated settlements that dotted the vast Arizona Territory.

One hundred and forty three years later we look back with gratitude for the courage, vision, and faith of that lonely rider, Alexander Groves, and the small but hardy group of men and women who welcomed him to their humble community on the banks of the Salt River in the middle of the desert. That fledgling group began gathering regularly for worship under the spiritual leadership of Rev. Groves, and was the inception of what we now know as Central United Methodist Church.” ~www.centralumc.com/history

In the beginning they gathered for worship on the banks of the Salt River under a grove of Mesquite trees. Doesn’t that sound wonderful?

They moved to the County Courtroom in the Hancock Monihon Building where the first public school classes were being held. Later when the Adobe School house was built the congregation met there.

Construction on Central United Methodist Church’s first permanent home, a 28 X 32 foot adobe structure was completed in 1872.

By 1904 they had grown so much that they moved into its second permanent structure; a brick building. In 1909 the first pipe organ was installed.

They continued to grow so erected a more spacious white columned building in 1926. In 1946 the congregation purchased 4 1/2 acres on the outskirts of Phoenix at Central and Palms Lanes for $44,900. The present Mission Style structure was dedicated in 1950. ~http://www.centralumc.com/history/

I walked across the street to make an image of the whole front of the Church,

Central United Methodist Church

There’s an electric train that runs up and down Central so there are wires all the way across the view. I used artistic license and cloned them out.

Here are some other doors, and a window gleaned from my walk around the church,

Two Doors

Exterior Door C U Methodist Church

Central United Methodist Church Front Doors

South Sanctuary Doors

Window Central United Methodist Church

They were so nice to let me inside to see their beautiful chapel, and allow me to wander around the grounds.

Before I knew it it was time to return to the airport to pick up my friends.

O/T: Today is Thanksgiving here in the United States, and I like to wish all my blogging friends in the States a very Happy Thanksgiving!

To all of you in other places around the globe I wish you a wonderful day, and wish everyone a wonderful week-end.

I’m very thankful for you all. You lift me up, and inspire me daily. Thank you!

May your holiday be filled with love and laughter!

Nikon Df| Nikkor 17-35mm| Turkey image made in 2011 in Amador County

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I’m not sure if this is a Sharp-shinned Hawk, or  a Cooper’s Hawk, or something else all together, but I’m leaning towards a Sharp-shinned because of its long legs, overall size, and notched tail feathers.

The Look

It wasn’t happy about getting its picture taken.  He was on a post in an irrigation canal probably hoping for a fish dinner.🙂

If you know what species it is I’d love to hear from you!

Nikon D700| Nikkor 200-500mm| Lexar Professional Digital Film

More to come…

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

One of the nicest things about the time change is that I am able to see doors in a new light.

I liked the twinklie lights, and the warm glow emanating from the door windows.

N°4883

n4883-thursday-door-illuminated

Nikon Df| Nikkor 17-35mm| Delkin Digital Film

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I mentioned in yesterday’s blog post here that photographing November’s Super Moon was N° 1 on my photography list of things to do this past week-end.

Quite awhile back I made plans to shoot it with with friends, and a photography group we’re in in central California at a Sandhill Crane Refuge called Woodbridge Ecological Reserve aka Isenberg Crane Reserve.    The Sandhill Cranes Winter here, and in November both Greater and Lesser Sandhill Cranes are on the Reserve.

The goal was to photograph the Sandhill Crane’s evening Fly-in and rising Super Moon.

Here is a series of images I made.

It was hazy and a little cloudy, but here is the Moon just rising above the mountains. You can barely see the mountains.

Rising Super Moon

…some Sandhill Cranes making their way into the Marsh.

Sandhill Cranes and the Super Moon November 2016

super-moon-and-reflection

Two Sandhill Cranes flying in high in front of the Moon.

Sandhill Cranes and the Super Moon

Once the sun went down it was pretty tough shooting. I really pushed the ISO to keep my shutter speed up so the Sandhill Cranes wouldn’t be too blurry, but I failed for the most part. I also focused on the Moon and not the Cranes which didn’t help keep the Cranes sharp.  Still. I would do it all over again. It was an amazing evening hearing and seeing the Cranes coming in with this year’s special Super Moon, and the company was the best.

Nikon D700| Nikkor 200-500mm| Lexar Digital Film| PS CC 2017 & On1 Photo 10.5

More to come…

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVE

It was a busy week-end with little to no time spent on the computer. Of course Photography figured high on my list of things to do this past week-end.

The Super Moon was number 1 on my list and I made plans months ago to shoot it with friends in Central Valley Calif.  We were a large group and while waiting for the group to assemble before heading to our chosen shooting location I was photographing little birds in a nearby bush.

A friend and I spied a little flighty bird hopping from one branch to the next all the while staying deep in the foliage.  I thought it might be a Warbler of some sort, but couldn’t be sure until I got a better look.  I watched and waited hoping it would come out just for one good look and image. A little patience paid off.  It showed itself in the open less than a minute! I managed to get only 3 frames of it hoping with fingers crossed that just one of those frames would be good.

Imagine my delight at finding I liked all three well enough to keep and share!

Then late last night I was trying to catch up with blogs and emails and read Donna’s post about her latest birding adventure and there in her images was a bird that looked just like the little bird I photographed that very afternoon!

I pulled out my Stokes Field Guide to the Birds of North America to compare my bird, and Donna’s bird with the Field Guide to see if I had a match and positive identification.  I believe so!  If true then this bird is a new ” Lifer” for me! An exciting spotting indeed! Thank you Donna!

Without further ado I present a Ruby-crowned Kinglet with the 3 images I made:

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-crowned Kinglet

Ruby-Crowned Kinglet

If you think this is different bird please let me know!

Nikon D700| Nikkor 200-500mm| Lexar Professional Digital Film|

More to come…

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