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Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

My original Photography plans for last week-end fell apart mid-week when one of the friends I was going with fell ill.  Rather than go anyway which didn’t sit well with me or my friend Theresa we two switched gears and decided to go birding in the Central Valley to see what birds if any had arrived early.

I had read a few reports of early migrants in the area; we hoped to find one or two, and spend some time catching up with each other.

I left for T’s house early (6:30am) so we’d get to the Refuge in the morning when the birds are more active.

We found the first pond completely sans water. Fish and Wildlife have just started filling the ponds we discovered. Many of the ponds we’re used to seeing full of water were bone dry, but it is early in the season!

Just as we were starting the auto-route we spied a Doe and her Fawn in the tall grass. I didn’t get an image of them together. Mom decided her male Fawn was too close to the road and moved to higher grass.  Honestly, I think she looks young!

Doe  Deer Female

The Fawn has two little adorable antler nubs.Fawn Male

Early arrivals: There were quite a few White-fronted Geese on the little islands in the ponds that had water.

White-fronted Goose

Northern Pintails, and Shovelers are showing up, but I didn’t make any images of the Shovelers they were too far out. You see a Northern Pintail in image above giving me a one wing salute.🙂

Among the usual suspects here were thousands of Dragonflies,

Dragon Fly

Pied-billed Grebes

Pied-billed Grebe

Night Herons; most were deep in the foliage, but one was on Sentry duty,

Night Heron

We saw a female Harrier flying low in the distance hunting, a few Red-tail Hawks, and as we approached the tree the Bald Eagles hang out in there we saw there was a Peregrine Falcon perched on a snag surveying the land.

Copyright © 2016 Deborah M. Zajac ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Once the Eagles return I doubt we’ll be seeing this Falcon in this tree.🙂

Plan B turned out to be a great day, and it was lovely  hanging out with Theresa. You can find her images on flickr here.

Nikon D700| Nikkor 200-500mm VR| Lexar Professional Digital Film| PS CC 2015.5

More to come…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

After photographing the Harvest Moon (image here) last Friday night I was walking up the hill to the car when I couldn’t help but notice, and remark how lovely the West Cliff Inn looked all lit up, and her transom window over the entry door looked lovely too.

My friend replied, “There’s your next door!”.    Don’t you love friends that support our thing for doors? I do!🙂

West Cliff Inn/Lynch House Santa Cruz, CA

West Cliff Inn- Lynch House

For the History Buffs:

“Most of those who descended on California during the Gold Rush never struck it rich. One exception was prospector Sedgewick Lynch, a carpenter-turned-49er who made his fortune in the gold fields, then made his way to Santa Cruz. Lynch continued to use his carpentry skills; he built the original Santa Cruz wharf, among other local projects.

In 1877, Lynch built his family manse on a bluff with a commanding view of the ocean, just a short walk from the lighthouse.  The Lynch House was among the town’s most prominent residences, constructed for the then-startlingly high cost of $12,000. The house was initially the only home on the cliff, but by the turn of the century, similarly grand neighbors joined it, giving birth to the nickname “Millionaires’ Row.”

Over the next hundred years, the Lynch House morphed from family home to hospital, to office space and vacation rental.  By 2004, it was dilapidated. But the Italianate Grand Dame of West Cliff Drive was in luck; the new owners wanted to save the historic property, so they undertook a complete renovation to the building.

Four Sisters Inn’s President Shelley Post collaborated on every phase of the rehabilitation project, and her strong knowledge of what guests want influenced many design decisions. For example, soaking in a large tub after a long day at the beach is on Shelley’s list of favorite things, which is why almost every room soon had a deep soaking tub.

Work began in 2004, and by June of 2007, the Lynch House was as beautiful as ever, ready to welcome Santa Cruz visitors under her new name: Four Sisters Inns.”~westcliffinn.com

~westcliffinn.com

I remember when the house was looking quite run down. I am so happy it was restored and converted to  a B&B and preserved as an Historical Landmark in 2007. It looks beautiful today.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2015.5

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

A friend and I went over the hill to Santa Cruz, CA this month to photograph the Moon rising above Walton Lighthouse.   We both really like having water in the image, and pretty foregrounds.

We knew there wouldn’t be much time to shoot since the Moon would need time to climb to get above the Lighthouse, and it’s getting dark earlier.

When we got out of the car and looked at the horizon and lighthouse we groaned. There was a thick band of fog just sitting on the horizon.  We wouldn’t see the Moon until it got above that! Time wouldn’t be on our side.

The sun had set and the sky was getting darker…finally I saw the top of the Moon above the fog bank.

Harvest Moon 2016

The Moon got high enough for me to make it out almost completely.

2016 Harvest Moon

It finally got out of the Fog only to be obscured again.  I tried to get a few more images, but it was getting too dark to keep the foreground in the image, and I wanted that.  I was also a bit frustrated with the wind, and shaking from the passing cars which shook my rig, and the pier I was photographing from. I deleted quite a few blurry images.

The color of the Moon was gorgeous though, and it was big being so close to the horizon. It would have looked much larger when it was just above that tree line if I could have seen it then.  Maybe next month.🙂

“The September Moon is called the Harvest Moon or Corn Moon because this is the time to finish harvesting the corn and other crops before Winter. The bright moonlight gives farmers a little extra time to harvest their crops before the first day of Fall. “~sfgate.com

Nikon Df| Nikkor 200-500mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2015.5

More to come…

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I didn’t get out on a Doorscursion this week so I’ve dug into my NYC trip files to post a door from my May 2016 trip.

One of the “must do” places we visited was the MET (Metropolitan Museum of Art) there I spied many doors on display!

Here’s one I photographed:

Pair of Carved Doors in the Beveled Style: 9th Century

Information from the MET regarding the pair:

“This carved pair (with 31.119.2) of teak doors imported into Iraq from Southeast Asia is probably from a royal or domestic residence. They epitomize the Beveled style—a symmetrical, abstract, vegetal form—and were probably originally painted and highlighted with gilding. The doors are said to have been found at Takrit, but were probably originally made in Samarra, the palace city of the Abbasid caliphs for a brief time in the mid‑ninth century.”

Carved Doors 9th Century

I loved finding ancient doors in the Museum.  It was nice to know that there have been door lovers for a long, long time, and some thought to save this lovely pair.  :)

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2015.5

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Last night I met Gordon, and some other friends in a Meet-Up group we’re in up on Mt. Tamilpias in Marin County to photograph the sunset, and then image the night sky.

There was an Astrology lecture in the Amphitheater so the park was open much later than it normally is which allowed us to stay late. YEAH! Normally the park closes a bit after sunset.

This is 74 frames stacked in PS CC 2015.5.

My settings were f2.2| 30seconds ea.| ISO 320| Manual Priority| Tripod|

Star Trails

4 planes, and one shooting star flew through the sky while I was imaging. I didn’t see the shooting star at the time as I was looking away helping a friend with her settings and intervalometer. I was thrilled to see I caught it on film though.

It was a lovely night, not windy, or cold, and the company was great!

Nikon Df| Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G| Delkin Digital Film

More to come…

 

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

N°s 2248, 2250, & 2252.

3 Red Doors

Nikon Df| Nikkor 24-70mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2015.5

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

After spending 2 hours or so photographing Dahlias in the East Garden of the Conservatory of Flowers I thought I’d go up the small flight of stairs to photograph the Conservatory building, and doors before it got really crowded with Sunday park goers and tourists.

Main Entrance Doors:

Main Entrance Conservatory of Flowers

The Conservatory of Flowers has quite a history so, for the History Buffs:

The mission of the Conservatory of Flowers is to connect people and plants in a place of exceptional beauty.

“The Conservatory of Flowers has captivated guests for more than a century. This gem of Victorian architecture has a long and storied history, and is the oldest public wood-and-glass conservatory in North America. As a city, state and national historic landmark, the Conservatory remains one of the most photographed and beloved attractions in San Francisco.”~http://www.conservatoryofflowers.org/

 

Main Entrance Wide View:

Conservatory of Flowers Main Entrance

“In the mid-19th century, James Lick, a wealthy businessman and philanthropist, ordered the greenhouse for his Santa Clara estate. Unfortunately, Lick died before it was erected, and the parts remained in crates, unused for decades. The kit was put up for sale by Lick’s trustees in 1877, and purchased by a group of prominent San Franciscans who offered it to the City. The civic-minded group of donors included Leland Stanford, founder of Stanford University and Governor and Senator of California, and Charles Crocker, the industrialist responsible for much of the railroad system in the West. The Conservatory opened to the public in 1879. It was an instant sensation and quickly became the most visited location in the park.

Since its opening, the building has seen more than its share of accidents and natural disasters. In 1883 the dome was  damaged by a boiler explosion. Charles Crocker came to the rescue with $10,000 for the restoration work. During this restoration, the dome was raised by six feet and the eagle finial on top of the dome was replaced with the planet Saturn, likely a reference to the ancient Roman god of agriculture.

In 1918, the dome and adjoining room burned again, and in 1933 structural instabilities caused a 13-year closure. The most devastating damage was done by a wind storm in 1995. After a winter of storms, 20 percent of the trees in Golden Gate Park were toppled and wind patterns changed. As a result, a relatively mild windstorm severely damaged the newly exposed Conservatory. Forty percent of the glass smashed, a portion of the rare plants were lost, and the building had to be closed.

In early 1998, the Conservatory was placed on the 100 most Endangered World Monuments list by the World Monuments Fund. The National Trust for Historic Preservation adopted the Conservatory into its Save America’s Treasures program, launched as part of then First Lady Hillary Clinton’s Millennium Council projects. Publicity from these efforts eventually led to a fundraising campaign to raise the $25 million dollars for the rehabilitation, which included support from the Richard & Rhoda Goldman Fund. The Conservatory reopened in 2003.

Docents are often asked how the Conservatory faired in the earthquake of 1906. The building stood strong, without damage, and the area leading up to the building, known as Conservatory Valley, became a location of temporary tents housing San Franciscans escaping the devastation and fires throughout the city.

Since reopening in 2003, over 2 million visitors have visited the Conservatory of Flowers, including tens of thousands of school children on free educational tours and hundreds of couples marrying in the most romantic spot in San Francisco. This modern version of the Conservatory strives to connect people and plants in a way that is most meaningful for the Bay Area community and for visitors from around the world.

And the Conservatory is a place where horticultural societies, botany students, and young plant enthusiasts gather to study collections and ensure passion for living museums and conservatories will continue to flourish.

Since re-opening in 2003, the Conservatory has garnered numerous local, state and national awards.” Abridged: ~conservatoryofflowers.org

Aquatic Plants Gallery Doors: “The magical pools in the Aquatic Plants Gallery simulate the flow of a river winding through the tropics. The gallery features carnivorous pitcher plants, warm-growing orchids, and brightly painted Heliconia and Hibiscus. Giant taro leaves line the pond and the flowers of hundreds of bromeliads emerge from their water-filled buckets. A sculpture of a Victoria amazonica water lily hangs suspended in the air. The Victoria amazonica, lotus plants, and colorful water lilies grow in the ponds during the summers when water conditions are just right.”~ conservatoryofflowers.org

Conservatory of Flowers San Francisco

The Conservatory and south garden; I think this garden is gorgeous.

Conservatory of Flowers San Francisco

Standing at the top of the stairs in the image above I made this image below; the view is looking south: Sutro Tower is in the distance on Twin Peaks. On Sunday the road that this bridge is part of is closed to vehicles which makes it a bit of challenge to find parking, but it’s a boon for pedestrians, and cyclists. Isn’t that stone bridge lovely.  It’s for that bridge that I made the photo.  Pedestrians can safely cross the road by using the tunnel under the bridge during the week.  The flowers in the beds that I recognized are Foxglove and Begonia. There are other flowers, but I don’t know what they are.

South Garden Conservatory of Flowers

 

I went back to the Dahlia garden after making this last image.  I’ll share more of those images soon.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 24-70mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2015.5

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

http://www.conservatoryofflowers.org/

 

 

 

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