Thursday Doors- Bowers Mansion

Copyright ©2019 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Twice in October, I went out to Washoe City to tour the grounds of Bowers Mansion. Washoe City is between Carson City, and Reno, NV.  My goal was Fall Color, and Doors.  These images are about a week apart.

The story behind the mansion is one of Boom and Bust during the Comstock Lode years.

Let’s walk around the grounds, shall we?

For the History Buffs- we go to WikiPedia for this information:

The land originally was purchased in 1856 by Eilley and her second husband Alex Cowan, who returned to Utah a year later with other Mormon settlers. Eilley secured a divorce and moved to Gold Hill where she ran a boarding house and took in washing. Some miners, unable to pay for lodging and laundry with cash, gave Eilley Orrum pieces of their mining claims in payment. Thus she acquired the mining claim which, together with that belonging to her third husband Sandy, became the source of their fortune.

 

Bowers Mansion

Bowers Mansion

The mansion was the fulfillment of Eilley’s dreams of prestige and respectability. The mansion, designed by J. Neely Johnson, a builder and ex-governor of California, combined Georgian Revival and Italianate architectural styles. It was modeled after a design conceived by Eilley based on her recollection of elegant buildings in her native Scotland. Indeed, the Bowers employed stonecutters from Scotland for the construction of their new home, which eventually cost $300,000 to build,[2] an exorbitant sum in the 1860s. Eilley and Sandy toured Europe from 1861 to 1863, purchasing furniturestatuary, paintings and other adornments for their home. Unfortunately, during one of these trips abroad, Eilley Bowers’s only child, a daughter named Pearl, died.

Under the Boughs at Bower's Mansion

Following the death of Sandy Bowers in 1868, Eilley fell on hard financial times. She generated income by renting out rooms in the mansion and hosting parties and picnics on the grounds. The mansion hosted a ball for the women’s suffrage movement and was the location of the annual Miner’s Ball. The period of 1873–75 was the height of the mansion’s popularity.[3]

However, this was not enough to overcome Eilley’s debts and she finally lost her home to foreclosure in 1876. The mansion was abandoned by the time Henry Riter acquired it and operated it as a resort until 1946.

Front Door and Entry to Bower's MansionBowers Mansion

Today:

The building is currently owned and operated by the Washoe County Parks Department. Some 500 Nevada families have donated period furniture housed in the mansion. The park blends the historical site with recreational facilities such as a spring-fed swimming pool, picnic areas, and a playground. Tours of the mansion are given in summer and autumn.

~https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bowers_Mansion

Bowers Mansion VIsitors Center

Bowers Mansion

Copyright © Deborah M. Zajac ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

The Mansion tours were closed both days that I went to photograph the Mansion.  I plan to go back and tour the inside one day.

This post is part of Norm Frampton’s Thursday Doors.

Head over to his blog for his Thursday Doors, and see all the other doors people have posted this week.

Nikon D810| Nikkor 24-120mm| Lexar Digital Film| PS CC

more to come…