National Train Day 2018

Copyright ©2018 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

 

Dan from No Facilities blog has been reminding Train Lovers about National Train Day for several years, and I’m so glad he’s sent those reminders otherwise I would likely forget to post the train images I’ve been saving for the day, and how special is it this year?  It’s on my Birthday! I’ve scheduled this post ahead of time because I plan to be birding, or sleeping in when it goes live. 🙂  See Dan Antion’s  Train post on his blog  here.

Last August when we were in Carson City, NV. house hunting ( after nearly a year of looking) we found a house we loved late one afternoon, and we and our Realtor planned to meet early the following morning to write up the offer.

He-Man and I rose really early, dressed, ate breakfast and headed out because I wanted to stop at the Nevada State Railroad Museum before our meeting with our Realtor.  All the months we’d been driving up and down Hwy 395 while house hunting I’d been eyeing the place and wanting to visit thinking it would be perfect for National Train Day plus I really liked the trains I was seeing at the station.

We arrived at the Museum before they were actually open for business and  am I glad we did as we were able to see the Conductors/Engineers roll out the trains from the Shed they’d be using that day, and we got to see them put each of the Motor cars on an old-fashioned manual labor turntable, and switch tracks!

They were so kind and let me take all the photos I wanted. You know,  I stayed well out of their way so not to lose that privilege.  I was good I never crossed an unwritten or written line. Phew!

I have so many images, but I’ve paired it down to a few because I’ve included some information about each Motor car which makes this a long post for me.

The Conductors chatting before work,

The Turntable with an Engineer switching the track:

 

Motor Car 22- Virginia and Truckee – For the History Buffs I gleaned this about the car from Wikipedia.

Virginia and Truckee Railway Motor Car 22, also called McKeen Motor Car 70, is a gasoline-powered railcar at the Nevada State Railroad Museum in Carson Cityin the U.S. state of Nevada. It was built for the Virginia and Truckee Railroad in 1910 by the McKeen Motor Car Company. Motor Car 22 was operated by the Virginia and Truckee until 1945, when it was sold off and became a diner until 1955. It eventually became the office and storage space for a plumbing business before it was donated to the Nevada State Railroad Museum in 1995. After a thorough study,[2] the Museum undertook a restoration of the McKeen car in 1997. The restored motor car was unveiled in 2010, a century after it was originally delivered to the Virginia and Truckee. Motor Car 22 was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005, and designated a National Historic Landmark in 2012. It is one of a few surviving McKeen railcars, and the only one that is operational.[“`https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virginia_and_Truckee_Railway_Motor_Car_22

Tucson Cornelia and Gila Bend RR N°401- For the History Buffs I gleaned this information from the Nevada State Railroad Museum’s Site

” Motor car No. 401 was built by the Edwards Motor Car Co. of Sanford, NC and put into service October 1926 by the Tucson, Cornelia & Gila Bend Railroad of Ajo, AZ. The motor car operated regularly until December 31, 1947 and was finally donated to Travel Town in Los Angeles, California.

The motor car traveled over 783,000 miles while in service, running between the copper mine at Ajo and Gila Bend, a distance of 43 miles. The car was powered by a six-cylinder White gasoline engine that was installed in November 1943, replacing the original after 17 years of service.

During 1963 the motor car was traded to Mr. Lindley Bothwell for two Los Angeles trolley cars. Acquired by Short Line Enterprises in 1975, the motor car was restored and operated in Virginia City during the 1976 season as the Washoe Zephyr No. 50. The motor car was moved to Jamestown, California and stored until it was moved to the Nevada State Railroad Museum in spring of 1988. The motor car is now owned by the museum.

The No. 50 received a new 75 HP Cummins diesel engine during the spring of 1997. The diesel engine replaced a 75 HP White gasoline engine. The White engine was installed about 1943, replacing the motorcar’s original Continental engine.

In 1999, the motor car received a new fluid drive transmission, and, before participating in Rail-fair ’99 at the California State Railroad Museum, was painted to reflect its appearance on the TC&GB.”

–Staff and Sagebrush Headlight–

Both Motor Cars at Wabuska Station waiting for passengers.

One can have a train ride from the Wabuska Station from May to December on the week-ends. I don’t know how far or where they go, but I plan to get that information and ride both cars if time allows, and visit the museum when I return. ( The museum is a short walk from the Station)

I made a time-lapse of the trains coming out of the shed and being put on the turntable from 54 of my still images.  It goes pretty fast.  If I ever start to do more videos I’ll use a dedicated video camera and hopefully do a better job in the developing process.

 

I wish I could have spent more time there, and ridden the trains, but time wasn’t on our side.  I had a blast seeing the trains come out for the day’s operation though.  I’ll be going back there. They have a Steamie (Steam Engine) too! It doesn’t run all the time. When it does I want to be there for it!

Plus 1 more! It was August and the sunflowers in front of the Museum were in bloom and at peak. I could not resist them!  🙂

I hope you liked this post for National Train Day.

The Inside Track:   Our offer was accepted. We bought the house! We’re renting it out until we can move.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm| Lexar Digital Film| Stills, and Timelapse developed in PS CC 2018

more to come…

 

 

 

 

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Thursday Doors 35/52 Conservatory of Flowers San Francisco, CA.

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

After spending 2 hours or so photographing Dahlias in the East Garden of the Conservatory of Flowers I thought I’d go up the small flight of stairs to photograph the Conservatory building, and doors before it got really crowded with Sunday park goers and tourists.

Main Entrance Doors:

Main Entrance Conservatory of Flowers

The Conservatory of Flowers has quite a history so, for the History Buffs:

The mission of the Conservatory of Flowers is to connect people and plants in a place of exceptional beauty.

“The Conservatory of Flowers has captivated guests for more than a century. This gem of Victorian architecture has a long and storied history, and is the oldest public wood-and-glass conservatory in North America. As a city, state and national historic landmark, the Conservatory remains one of the most photographed and beloved attractions in San Francisco.”~http://www.conservatoryofflowers.org/

 

Main Entrance Wide View:

Conservatory of Flowers Main Entrance

“In the mid-19th century, James Lick, a wealthy businessman and philanthropist, ordered the greenhouse for his Santa Clara estate. Unfortunately, Lick died before it was erected, and the parts remained in crates, unused for decades. The kit was put up for sale by Lick’s trustees in 1877, and purchased by a group of prominent San Franciscans who offered it to the City. The civic-minded group of donors included Leland Stanford, founder of Stanford University and Governor and Senator of California, and Charles Crocker, the industrialist responsible for much of the railroad system in the West. The Conservatory opened to the public in 1879. It was an instant sensation and quickly became the most visited location in the park.

Since its opening, the building has seen more than its share of accidents and natural disasters. In 1883 the dome was  damaged by a boiler explosion. Charles Crocker came to the rescue with $10,000 for the restoration work. During this restoration, the dome was raised by six feet and the eagle finial on top of the dome was replaced with the planet Saturn, likely a reference to the ancient Roman god of agriculture.

In 1918, the dome and adjoining room burned again, and in 1933 structural instabilities caused a 13-year closure. The most devastating damage was done by a wind storm in 1995. After a winter of storms, 20 percent of the trees in Golden Gate Park were toppled and wind patterns changed. As a result, a relatively mild windstorm severely damaged the newly exposed Conservatory. Forty percent of the glass smashed, a portion of the rare plants were lost, and the building had to be closed.

In early 1998, the Conservatory was placed on the 100 most Endangered World Monuments list by the World Monuments Fund. The National Trust for Historic Preservation adopted the Conservatory into its Save America’s Treasures program, launched as part of then First Lady Hillary Clinton’s Millennium Council projects. Publicity from these efforts eventually led to a fundraising campaign to raise the $25 million dollars for the rehabilitation, which included support from the Richard & Rhoda Goldman Fund. The Conservatory reopened in 2003.

Docents are often asked how the Conservatory faired in the earthquake of 1906. The building stood strong, without damage, and the area leading up to the building, known as Conservatory Valley, became a location of temporary tents housing San Franciscans escaping the devastation and fires throughout the city.

Since reopening in 2003, over 2 million visitors have visited the Conservatory of Flowers, including tens of thousands of school children on free educational tours and hundreds of couples marrying in the most romantic spot in San Francisco. This modern version of the Conservatory strives to connect people and plants in a way that is most meaningful for the Bay Area community and for visitors from around the world.

And the Conservatory is a place where horticultural societies, botany students, and young plant enthusiasts gather to study collections and ensure passion for living museums and conservatories will continue to flourish.

Since re-opening in 2003, the Conservatory has garnered numerous local, state and national awards.” Abridged: ~conservatoryofflowers.org

Aquatic Plants Gallery Doors: “The magical pools in the Aquatic Plants Gallery simulate the flow of a river winding through the tropics. The gallery features carnivorous pitcher plants, warm-growing orchids, and brightly painted Heliconia and Hibiscus. Giant taro leaves line the pond and the flowers of hundreds of bromeliads emerge from their water-filled buckets. A sculpture of a Victoria amazonica water lily hangs suspended in the air. The Victoria amazonica, lotus plants, and colorful water lilies grow in the ponds during the summers when water conditions are just right.”~ conservatoryofflowers.org

Conservatory of Flowers San Francisco

The Conservatory and south garden; I think this garden is gorgeous.

Conservatory of Flowers San Francisco

Standing at the top of the stairs in the image above I made this image below; the view is looking south: Sutro Tower is in the distance on Twin Peaks. On Sunday the road that this bridge is part of is closed to vehicles which makes it a bit of challenge to find parking, but it’s a boon for pedestrians, and cyclists. Isn’t that stone bridge lovely.  It’s for that bridge that I made the photo.  Pedestrians can safely cross the road by using the tunnel under the bridge during the week.  The flowers in the beds that I recognized are Foxglove and Begonia. There are other flowers, but I don’t know what they are.

South Garden Conservatory of Flowers

 

I went back to the Dahlia garden after making this last image.  I’ll share more of those images soon.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 24-70mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2015.5

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

http://www.conservatoryofflowers.org/

 

 

 

Thursday Doors 28/52

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Last week-end while in Point Reyes National Seashore I went out to Pierce Point Ranch which is where the road ends heading north in the park.   I was planning to hike out to see the herd of Tule Elk, but it was so foggy reports from hikers returning from the trail said they’d not seen or heard the Elk.  So, instead of hiking I stayed at the ranch and took photographs of some of the buildings and doors.

For the History Buffs:

The Ranch was constructed by Solomon Pierce in the 1860’s. It was the most successful “butter rancho” in Point Reyes Township.  

In the 1880’s the ranch was leased to a series of tenants, and in the mid 1930’s it was sold to the McClure family which operated it’s Grade B dairy until the about 1945, when dairy ranching ceased after 90 years. 

The complex includes the 1869 and earlier sections of the two-story main house, the tank house, school, woodshed, carpenter shop, blacksmith shop, dairy, horse barn, slaughter house, hay barn, hog sheds,  and pens.  It represents the most extensive surviving historic complex in the Point Reyes National Seashore. 

The Pierce Point Ranch on Tomales Point ceased operations in 1973. Three years later, Congress authorized creation of the wilderness area incorporating that ranch as habitat for the reintroduction of Tule Elk. Beginning in 1980, NPS invested in the rehabilitation of the ranch core, citing it as the best example of a nineteenth century west Marin dairy ranch. Pierce Point Ranch was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985, and was subsequently opened to the public as an interpretive site.“~http://wikimapia.org/100600/Pierce-Point-Ranch

Dairy/Long Barn Doors:

Long Barn Doors Pierce Point Ranch

The Dairy/Long Barn- It was so foggy the sky was white so, I converted this image to Black and White.

Long Barn Pierce Ranch

another image of the Dairy and shed with a couple more doors.

Dairy Barn Pierce Point Ranch

This might be the school house,

Pierce Point Ranch Point Reyes National Seashore

Closer look of door of possible school,

Door to building at Pierce Point Ranch

A closer look at that door knob, and pad lock,

Door knob and Best Lock Pierce Point Ranch

Here’s an image of a male Tule Elk that I took here back in 2012. Can you see the velvet hanging off his antlers around his face? He’s scratching it off and polishing his antlers.  I saw him on Bachelors Hill.

Tule Elk Male

The Bachelor’s; There were quite a few of them that year.  They were also pretty far away. My lens was stretched beyond its limits that day too.

Tule Elk Males

The only wildlife I saw while at the ranch Saturday was an Alligator Lizard sunning itself.

 

Alligator Lizard

It was a great day despite the fog and no Elk.

Nikon Df w/ Nikkor 28-105mm| Delkin Digital Film, and Lumix FZ200, Lexar Digital Film,

The 2012 images were made with the Nikon D700 w/Nikkor 70-300mm VR, SanDisk Digital Film

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

Thursday Doors 25/52 25 W. 50th St, NYC

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Walking back to our place after a play late one evening this entrance with the cut-out Egyptian Motif all lit up, and clock caught my eye. The brass doors fit this style perfectly.  I love the revolving door. Though I’m always afraid I look awkward shuffling my way through them.

I dug around the Internet to glean some information about the style, and building.

Shortly after the discovery of Tutankhamen’s Tomb in the 1920’s Egyptian Art Deco and Motif’s were popular themes for Architecture in NYC. In 1930 construction began on Rockefeller Center’s 14 Art Deco buildings.

Lee Lawrie was commissioned to design the entrance to The International Building. Lee Lawrie is most famous for the statue of “Atlas” located on 5th Avenue in Rockefeller Center.

 

Thursday Doors 25/52  25 West 50th St NYC

A little History:
The International Building began construction in 1933 and was complete by 1935. There are 41 floors in the building 39 are above ground, and it stands 512 ft (157m) tall.

Lee Lawrie:
Lee Oscar Lawrie (October 16, 1877 – January 23, 1963[1]) was one of the United States’ foremost architectural sculptors and a key figure in the American art scene preceding World War II. Over his long career of more than 300 commissions Lawrie’s style evolved through Modern Gothic, to Beaux-Arts Classicism and finally into Moderne or Art Deco.” ~Wikipedia.org

In 1987 Rockefeller Center was listed on National Register of Historic Places.

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 20mm f/1.8| Delkin Digital Film| Tripod| PS CC 2015

More to come…

Thursday Doors 24/52 Carnegie Lakeport Library

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

My friends and I arrived in Lakeport, CA a day before our Grebe boating trip because, we had a 3 hour drive to get there, and a 5:30 a.m. boarding time Sunday morning.

We spent Saturday afternoon birding in Clear Lake State park, then went to dinner at a local Thai place, and finally we wrapped up the day in Library Park on the lake front for sunset. Image here.  If you’re a foodie and in the area, and like/love Thai food; hit me up for this place. It’s great!

Before setting up for sunset I spotted a door I really wanted to photograph. It turned out to be a Carnegie Library Door!

Door

The Lakeport Library Committee submitted Carnegie’s ” Schedule of Questions” hoping they would qualify for a grant. The Carnegie Corp. approved an $8,000.00 grant in 1914. Construction started in 1917 and  was completed in 1918.

Carnegie Lakeport Library

The lake was actually all the way up here prior to dredging for Yolo County’s Power Plant which built Clear Lake Dam also in 1914.  White & Co., investment bankers in New York financed YWP’s dredging in Clear Lake and filling in the area along Lakeport’s waterfront. Owners of the new land deeded their property to Lakeport for a city park.

The library and building might have been lost to a fire in 1953 had not librarian Gertrude Benson smelled the smoke and called the Fire Department! It was an electrical fire which started in the attic. The fire department was able to extinguish the fire before major damage occurred.

In 1986 the county library moved from the cramped Carnegie to a new library on High Street in Lakeport.

In 2008 the Carnegie Library was entered into the National Parks Service’s National Register of Historic Places.

Just after the lights came on at the Gazebo, and the colors in the sky faded T, and Dali were hailing me from my reverie to come see it. They know me so well. They knew I’d want a photograph of that. 🙂

Library Park Gazebo Lakeport CA

In 2014 the building was vacant. The city contracted with Garavaglia Architecture, Inc. to prepare a Feasibility Study to see what needed to be done to preserve and save the building, and put to it other use.

The plaque/sign beside the door reads: City of Lakeport

CARNEGIE LIBRARY

I can’t make out the small font below that- then

LAKEPORT REDEVLOPMENT AGENGY

Redevelopment

Housing

Economic Development

CITY ATTORNEY

I could not find any current information about the building beyond 2014 in my surfing the Internet. I don’t know if it’s in use now or still vacant. It looks quite old and in need of some TLC en mon avis.

I love the lamps, which were in the design tastes of Carnegie’s secretary James Bertram. They symbolized enlightenment.

“Every Library was simple yet formal and entered through a prominent doorway, nearly always accessed by a staircase which symbolized a person’s elevation by learning.” ~Wiki-pedia.org

I really  love how people think of that stuff ahead of time and incorporate it in their plans during the design/planning stage.  Me. I never think of stuff like this ahead of time. It’s always a day, or month later!

Carnegie was a Scottish-American business man and philanthropist.  There were 2,509 Carnegie libraries built between 1883, and 1929. 1,689 were built in the United States of America. ~ Wiki-pedia

The History Buffs can find a pretty thorough history of the Carnegie Lakeport Library’s History here.

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links, or add your own.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 20mm f/1.8| Delkin Digital Film| Tripod| PS CC 2015

More to come…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday Doors 19/52 Ainsley House

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

For my Thursday Doors post this week I visited Ainsley House located a couple of miles from me in Campbell, CA.  A little history about Campbell, and the house.

“Campbell, CA is  small city located in Santa Clara County, and Silicon Valley. It’s bordered on the east, and north by San Jose, on the south by Los Gatos, and on the west by a small portion of Saratoga, and San Jose (which is where I live).

Campbell was founded by Benjamin Campbell, after whom the city was named. He came to California in 1846 with his father, William Campbell. William started a sawmill in Saratoga and surveyed the cities of San Jose and Santa Clara. In 1851, Benjamin bought 160 acres (0.65 km2) in southern Santa Clara Valley and cultivated hay and grain on it. This area later became Campbell’s historical downtown core.” ~ Wiki-pedia

This area was largely farm land and orchards in the 1800’s.

” In 1886 John Colpitts Ainsley, and Englishman, immigrated to California and made his fortune here in the canning of fresh fruit,  which was almost exclusively exported to England. In 1925, he and his wife Alcinda, built this retirement home in the English Tudor Revival style.

The house is both a symbol of his success and a time capsule of the 1920’s. The house and most of the furnishings were donated to the City of Campbell by the Ainsley’s granddaughters, Geraldine Lloyd Hicks and Georgene Lloyd Bowen.”~ The Campbell Museum FoundationAinsley House Front Door

The house was built in 1925. The house originally sat in the southwest of their 83 acre orchard on the corner of Hamilton and Johnson (now Bascom) Avenues. The historic home was moved to its present location at 300 Grant Street in Downtown Campbell in 1990.

Since its relocation it has been restored to its original 1920’s appearance inside and out.

Today the Ainsley House is a city run historic house museum open to the public.

The Ainsley House Campbell, CA

The carriage house is now the Morgan Gallery. It offers free exhibits and videos detailing the history of Campbell.

Ainsley House Carriage House Morgan Gallery

Since the museum/house was closed I wasn’t able to get in to see the inside or the backyard, but the Ainsley Volunteer Garden was open so, I popped in there and took a several images of the lovely flowers growing there.

Sunflower

Are these Button Willows? They’re lovely! Tall, and they spread out. They’d be too much for my yard I’m sorry to say.

Button Willows

 

Macro Photography

I don’t know what this flower is either, but it has a lovely cone like center. Is it a Dahlia?

Ainsley House Garden

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm micro lens| Tripod & Hand-held| Delkin Digital Film

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links, or add your own.

More to come…

 

 

 

Historic Alviso, CA: Thursday Doors 4/52

Copyright © 2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Last Sunday while I was out birding I knew I needed to get my Door image sorted out for Thursday Doors this week, and as I drove through Alviso to get to the Wildlife Refuge I thought,

” There’s some old and probably interesting doors in Alviso! I’ll take a spin through the old Cannery area to see what I find.”

For the History Buffs:

Alviso, CA.  is the northern boundary of San Jose, CA, and the Southern boundary of San Francisco Bay.  It once was an independent city, but in 1968 the town voted to consolidate with the city of San Jose, CA. Alviso has no US Mail delivery service. Residents have to go to the Post Office to collect their mail.

Alviso is 13 ft below sea level and had severe flooding in the 80’s, and again in the 90’s.  There was 10ft of water in parts of Alviso. The Guadalupe River, and Coyote Creek both end in Alviso and empty into the Bay via Alviso Slough, and Mud Slough.  Many homes and businesses were ruined in those floods.

There are few businesses in Alviso today.  It’s largely residential, and marsh land.

Speaking of marshland: Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge in Alviso is part of 6 other wildlife refuges in the Bay Area. Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, the first urban National Wildlife Refuge established in the United States, is dedicated to preserving and enhancing wildlife habitat, protecting migratory birds, protecting threatened and endangered species, and providing opportunities for wildlife-oriented recreation and nature study for the surrounding communities.

Now onto the Doors! 🙂

Here’s the front door of the Tilden-Laine House.

Tilden Laine House Front Door

Here’s how the whole house looks:

It’s style is called Italianate Victorian.   The home dates back to the early 1900’s. According to Wiki-Pedia it’s still owned by the Laines.

 

Tilden-Laine House Alviso CA

Right next door is what was once The Laine Store. The Tilden family ran the store from 1865-1912. In the 1920’s it became a Chinese Gambling hall.

The Laine Store Alviso CA 2016

I read that the flood watermark was over the top of the doors! On the Wiki page I linked to below are two images of the Laine store one from 1981, and the other from 2007.  It’s pretty interesting to see how much the building has aged in that time. The Laine Store is a Registered Historical Landmark.

After the San Francisco earthquake and fire in 1909 the Precita Canning Company moved to Alviso and reorganized and changed their name to the Bay Side Canning Company. It hasn’t been used since 1936. The city is letting the buildings decay.

Bayside Canning Co Doors

The last time I was there back in 2010 or 11, I was shooting portraits I had the model right up near the wall. Now there’s fencing all around the property.  The murals tell the story of Alviso’s history.

Bayside Canning CO

This building below with the two doors I just liked. I can’t find any information about it, but the street is residential though this building doesn’t look like it was a house. It looks like it’s being used for storage today.

Doors White Building Alviso

There are more doors and buildings I would like to photograph here! For more information and history see the link below.

~ history and info gleaned from Wikipedia  Pedia https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alviso,_San_Jose,_California#History

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors. Click here to see all the doors shared this week.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm | Hoodman STEEL Ultra High Speed Digital Film| Hand-held| PS CC 2015