This and That: Le Danseur/Ballerino

Copyright ©2017 Deborah M. Zajac  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Le Danseur/Ballerino

Lower Manhattan, NYC

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2017

More to come…

 

Thursday Doors 52/52

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Here it is my last week of my Project 52.  I thought I’d end with some doors that I have wanted to post since making the images, but there have been issues that have caused me to put them in a “failed” Door image folder. What issues you may be wondering?  Poles, wires, people, and other stuff that obstruct or mar the door image I hoped to make. The bane of most photographers everywhere.

I thought hoped I might be able to “content aware” this man out of this image I made while at Legoland earlier this year.  Not happening with my meager Photoshop skill set.  I would also need to add some canvas at the top to give the flag pole more space. That I can do!

Legoland Red Door

So, I moved a bit closer and photographed the door. Then I had lens flare.  I could just crop that out later. (rolling eyes) I really wanted to show both the door and the whole building which I thought was pretty neat. I just wanted to show sans people.  BTW: It’s one of the places you can buy something eat in Legoland.

Why not just wait until it’s clear of people you might ask? I waited several minutes, but #1 Grandson. 🙂  The reflection in the door’s window is kinda nice. I should have just gone for that. Door Fail! Red Door Legoland CA

While birding in northeastern California’s Pacific Flyway I spotted a church steeple while driving on the freeway and asked my friend if we could take a side trip to check it out because, Thursday Doors!

The church is Sacred Heart Catholic Church in Maxwell, CA. Here’s the original image.

It’s crooked, and there are both poles and wires in front and across it! I really wanted that cool partial reflection of the bell tower too.  I thought I’d try again to “content aware” out the pole and wires.

Sacred Heart Catholic Church Maxwell CA

Always hopeful…but after straightening the horizon, removing the wires, and trying OH. SO. MANY. TIMES. to clone out the pole on the left side of the building I gave up and filed the image in the “failed doors” folder.  I should have just stuck with the reflections. Again.

Sacred Heart Catholic Church Maxwell CA

For the History Buffs: Here’s a bit of history I found on the church’s website:

“Father Michael Wallrath established Sacred Heart Church in Maxwell as a mission in 1881. In 1911, Sacred Heart became a parish with missions in Williams (Church of the Annunciation, founded in 1892), in Stonyford (St. Mary of the Mountain, founded in 1896, and Arbuckle (Holy Cross, founded in 1899).
In 1917, a new church was built on its present day location at the corner of Elm and Olive Street in Maxwell.
Sacred Heart Parish has families consisting of two major ethic groups (English and Spanish speaking).”http://sacredheart-maxwell.org/our-beginings

Here are the Doors closer up.

Sacred Heart Catholic Church Maxwell CA

This final door…I didn’t even think about cloning out the people. I knew I wouldn’t be able to do it after my failures with the top two images.  I wish we had more time to shop in this store not to mention stand around waiting for a clear shot of the door. 🙂 Century 21 Department store… formerly River Savings Bank East.  I haven’t done any research on this door or building’s history, but the door is so unique and TALL!  I do like the sense of scale the people add to the image.

Century 21 Store side door

This wraps up my Project 52 of Thursday Doors, but I’ll still be posting doors in the year to come. I’ve thoroughly enjoyed the theme, meeting new bloggers, and consider several friends now. Thank you Norm for hosting this fun, addicting, and often times interesting subject.

Until the next “doorscursion” have a wonderful, and HAPPY NEW YEAR!

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 17-35mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2017

More to come…

Thursday Doors 37/52

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I didn’t get out on a Doorscursion this week so I’ve dug into my NYC trip files to post a door from my May 2016 trip.

One of the “must do” places we visited was the MET (Metropolitan Museum of Art) there I spied many doors on display!

Here’s one I photographed:

Pair of Carved Doors in the Beveled Style: 9th Century

Information from the MET regarding the pair:

“This carved pair (with 31.119.2) of teak doors imported into Iraq from Southeast Asia is probably from a royal or domestic residence. They epitomize the Beveled style—a symmetrical, abstract, vegetal form—and were probably originally painted and highlighted with gilding. The doors are said to have been found at Takrit, but were probably originally made in Samarra, the palace city of the Abbasid caliphs for a brief time in the mid‑ninth century.”

Carved Doors 9th Century

I loved finding ancient doors in the Museum.  It was nice to know that there have been door lovers for a long, long time, and some thought to save this lovely pair.  🙂

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2015.5

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

 

Thursday Doors 34/52 N°101

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

This week’s door is from my NYC trip in mid May.  I spotted this door while in Lower Manhattan.

I love shade this shade of green. Green is my favorite color. Weathered olive and sap greens are my FAVORITES! This green door with paneling all around the interior of the entryway, the red brick, and black iron handrails were a home run for me. 🙂

The door isn’t level though, and it’s driving me a bit nuts. I spent 10 minutes trying to get it level, but no joy. Hopefully it won’t bother you as much as it bugs me.  Through the years the building must have settled and shifted.

N°101 Lower Manhattan

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2015.5| Hand-held

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

 

Thursday Doors 31/52 N°213 W.

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I’m  back in my NYC files for this week’s Thursday Doors post.

After walking the Highline and working up an appetite we stopped at a Taco Vendor’s on the Highline and enjoyed street tacos and nachos.  Full now we headed back the way we came and we were wondering what to do next when I spotted the Empire State Building’s spire. It didn’t look like it was too far away so, we decided to walk there.

While walking there I spied this red door and had to stop for a picture of it.

St. John the Baptist Church’s Parish Office Door

Red Doors

Right next to it was a garden gate with which led to a side door to the church.

St John the Baptist Church Side Door

I loved the potted garden, and the doors with the clover moulding and pretty stone archway.

I never saw the front of the church or the inside, but wish I had! I have no information about the church building or church I’m afraid.

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

 

 

Thursday Doors 27/52

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I’m back to my NYC files for this week’s Thursday Doors.
On our first full day in the city we decided to get a quick education of the lay of the land by taking the Big Bus City Tour. While on the top deck of the bus we passed this door.

Cunard Line Doors

This building is the Cunard Building located in Lower Manhattan. The doors and entrance looked like they were made of gold. I had to get a quick photograph.

I knew nothing about the building or its history so, I looked it up once I returned home to CA.

History gleaned from Wikipedia

The building was designed between 1917 and 1919 and built between 1920 and 1921 by Benjamin Wistar Morris, architect, and Carrère & Hastings, in a consulting role. While the Alexander Hamilton U.S. Custom House already dominated Bowling Green, the Cunard Building was held in high regard almost immediately upon its opening in May 1921.[1] It featured more than 600,000 sq. feet of space in a modified Italian Renaissance style. Its great hall, which itself was more than sixty feet tall, was the home of Cunard Line and Anchor Lines with a number of other tenants throughout the building.[2] While 25 Broadway is considered to be its primary address, it’s also known as 13-27 Broadway, 13-39 Greenwich Street and 1-9 Morris Street. Within the borough of Manhattan it is designated Block 13, Lot 27.[3]

Its time as a ticketing hall ceased in 1968 and the building was sold in 1971. Its interior was converted to a post office, which remained in service until 2000.[4] On September 19, 1995, the first floor interior, formerly Cunard’s ticketing office, was designated a New York City landmark. The designation included the entrance vestibule and lobby, the passage to the Great Hall and the Hall up to the height of its rotunda. [3]

In 2014 the Great Hall became an event venue operated by Cipriani S.A.[5]

~https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cunard_Building_(New_York_City)

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm| Delkin Digital Film

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

Thursday Doors 25/52 25 W. 50th St, NYC

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Walking back to our place after a play late one evening this entrance with the cut-out Egyptian Motif all lit up, and clock caught my eye. The brass doors fit this style perfectly.  I love the revolving door. Though I’m always afraid I look awkward shuffling my way through them.

I dug around the Internet to glean some information about the style, and building.

Shortly after the discovery of Tutankhamen’s Tomb in the 1920’s Egyptian Art Deco and Motif’s were popular themes for Architecture in NYC. In 1930 construction began on Rockefeller Center’s 14 Art Deco buildings.

Lee Lawrie was commissioned to design the entrance to The International Building. Lee Lawrie is most famous for the statue of “Atlas” located on 5th Avenue in Rockefeller Center.

 

Thursday Doors 25/52  25 West 50th St NYC

A little History:
The International Building began construction in 1933 and was complete by 1935. There are 41 floors in the building 39 are above ground, and it stands 512 ft (157m) tall.

Lee Lawrie:
Lee Oscar Lawrie (October 16, 1877 – January 23, 1963[1]) was one of the United States’ foremost architectural sculptors and a key figure in the American art scene preceding World War II. Over his long career of more than 300 commissions Lawrie’s style evolved through Modern Gothic, to Beaux-Arts Classicism and finally into Moderne or Art Deco.” ~Wikipedia.org

In 1987 Rockefeller Center was listed on National Register of Historic Places.

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 20mm f/1.8| Delkin Digital Film| Tripod| PS CC 2015

More to come…