Thursday Doors 31/52 N°213 W.

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I’m  back in my NYC files for this week’s Thursday Doors post.

After walking the Highline and working up an appetite we stopped at a Taco Vendor’s on the Highline and enjoyed street tacos and nachos.  Full now we headed back the way we came and we were wondering what to do next when I spotted the Empire State Building’s spire. It didn’t look like it was too far away so, we decided to walk there.

While walking there I spied this red door and had to stop for a picture of it.

St. John the Baptist Church’s Parish Office Door

Red Doors

Right next to it was a garden gate with which led to a side door to the church.

St John the Baptist Church Side Door

I loved the potted garden, and the doors with the clover moulding and pretty stone archway.

I never saw the front of the church or the inside, but wish I had! I have no information about the church building or church I’m afraid.

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

 

 

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Thursday Doors 30/52 Trinity Lutheran Church

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

While over in Minden and Gardnerville, Nevada last Saturday we had a bit of time to kill so I cruised around looking for what else? DOORS! 🙂

The Steeple or Tower caught my eye of Trinity Lutheran Church before I knew what it was so He-Man and I made bee-line to the church.

Trinity Lutheran Church

This may have been the front door at one time, but I think they’re using a door on the East side now.  There were quite a few cars in the parking lot on that side, and I did see a large glass door, but didn’t venture over there thinking there was something going on…possibly a wedding. I erred on the side of CHICKEN, and stayed on the north side of the building.

I really like the brick work in the arch entryway, and blond doors. I’m also a huge fan of brass kick plates.

Interesting facts/History:

The church was established in 1877. The first Trinity Lutheran Church in Carson Valley.

The first service in the nearly completed first building was in 1895.  The official dedication ceremony for the newly built church was in 1897.

In 1899 a 1,020 pound church bell that was cast in France was installed.  I’m guessing the tower holds the bell. Sadly, I didn’t hear it while there, but later that afternoon I heard a church bell, and wondered if this was what I was hearing.

In 1918 the use of German was suspended until after World War I.

In 1930 they selected their first building committee, but the Great Depression in 1931 contributed to the collapse of the  first building effort.

1941 World War II begins. Many of their members enter the service 3 of which will not make it back.

Kenneth Storke was killed on the island of Luzon in 1945. His Grandfather, Henry Marquat donated the site for a new church also in 1945.

The following year they selected their second building committee, and in early Fall 1953 they held their last service in the old building.

In the fall of 1953 the new church was dedicated.

~trinitygv.com

Door to Trinity Lutheran Church

A side door closer look

Side Door Trinity Lutheran Church

and two plaques that are on the front brick work near the front doors.

Trinity Luthern Church Dedication Plaque

Building Age Plaque Trinity Lutheran Church

The doors are simple yet elegant, and building is beautiful I think.

I’ll be going back to the area before summer is over we’re looking at houses there, and I will stop by the church to see if I can get a look at the East and South sides of the building…and with any luck maybe a peek inside too. One can hope!

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

 

 

 

On the Mission Trail.

Continuing on my Mission adventure while visiting Big Baby Boy in southern California we went to Mission Basilica San Juan Capistrano.

Here are some photos of the newer chapel and grounds. I’ll post photos of the ruins soon, Here’s some history to pique your interest though.

HISTORY

Mission San Juan Capistrano has been the home to many people over 230 years of history. Its history consists of memories and stories of its past inhabitants and present visitors. It is a place of historical, cultural, and religious significance, as well as a place of inspiration and education.

The story begins in 1775, when Mission San Juan Capistrano was first founded by Father Lasuen, on October 19th. But just a few weeks after the party of padres and soldiers arrived, they received word of the revolt occurring in San Diego. The founding padres, and soldiers decided to leave San Juan Capistrano, and go back to San Diego to help there. Once things had settled in San Diego, Father Serra personally led a party to re-found Mission San Juan Capistrano on All Saint’s Day, November 1, 1776.

Mission San Juan Capistrano, became the seventh of twenty-one missions to be founded in Alta California. Like the previous six missions, San Juan Capistrano was established to expand the territorial boundaries of Spain, and to spread Christianity to the Native peoples of California. Unlike the British colonies on the East Coast of North America, who brought people from their homeland to form colonies, the Spanish believed they could transform the Native peoples into good Spanish citizens. The idea was to make colonial outposts called missions, led by Franciscan padres and Spanish soldiers. The missions would be a center of learning and training of Native peoples. The Spanish government and Catholic Church wanted to convert the people to Christianity, train them in Spanish or European lifestyle, so that the Native peoples would eventually live in towns and pay taxes, like good Spanish citizens.

In 1984, a modern church complex was constructed just north and west of the Mission compound; the design is patterned after the old stone church, and is twenty percent larger.

~Mission San Juan Capistrano

I have 11 photos posted here.

Copyright © 2010 Deborah M. Zajac. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2010 Deborah M. Zajac. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2010 Deborah M. Zajac. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright © 2010 Deborah M. Zajac. All Rights Reserved