Friday’s Feathered Friends-Great Horned Owl

Copyright ©2021 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Saturday I met some friends at a National Wildlife Refuge for some birding. One of those friends was Gordon. Some of you know him from his blog

https://wordpress.com/read/feeds/84102527/posts/3117603841

We adhered to the the Corona Virus Covid-19 guidelines by each driving their own car, and when out of the car we wore our masks and stood well apart. I can’t tell you how great it was to see friends I’d not seen in quite awhile. We had great birdy day with great weather for it too.

Upon my arrival while walking to the duck pond I crossed paths with another birder whom I didn’t know, but I ask him if he’d been seeing good birds and he replied while pointing that there was a Great Horned Owl just down there, and told me where to look. When I got to the pond I shared this info with my friends and we all headed up the trail to find the tree. While the Owl wasn’t in the tree he or she wasn’t too far away and we got some great looks, and images of it.

It’s not “in” the tree where it has its nest, but what a great look we got here. Wide awake!

Here it is in its nest. Just a split in the tree.

Copyright © 2021 Deborah M. Zajac ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Fun facts about the Great Horned Owl- From All About Birds.

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Great_Horned_Owl/

  • Great Horned Owls are fierce predators that can take large prey, including raptors such as Ospreys, Peregrine Falcons, Prairie Falcons, and other owls. They also eat much smaller items such as rodents, frogs, and scorpions.
  • When clenched, a Great Horned Owl’s strong talons require a force of 28 pounds to open. The owls use this deadly grip to sever the spine of large prey.
  • If you hear an agitated group of cawing American Crows, they may be mobbing a Great Horned Owl. Crows may gather from near and far and harass the owl for hours. The crows have good reason, because the Great Horned Owl is their most dangerous predator.
  • Even though the female Great Horned Owl is larger than her mate, the male has a larger voice box and a deeper voice. Pairs often call together, with audible differences in pitch.
  • Great Horned Owls are covered in extremely soft feathers that insulate them against the cold winter weather and help them fly very quietly in pursuit of prey. Their short, wide wings allow them to maneuver among the trees of the forest.
  • Great Horned Owls have large eyes, pupils that open widely in the dark, and retinas containing many rod cells for excellent night vision. Their eyes don’t move in their sockets, but they can swivel their heads more than 180 degrees to look in any direction. They also have sensitive hearing, thanks in part to facial disc feathers that direct sound waves to their ears.
  • The oldest Great Horned Owl on record was at least 28 years old when it was found in Ohio in 2005.

Late in the afternoon we returned to this refuge and went to look for the Owl again. It wasn’t in the nest, but perched on top of branch.

Great Horned Owl on a tree top

The Great Horned Owl is one of the most common owls in North America. It lives in deserts, wetlands, forests, grasslands, backyards, cities, and just about any other semi-open habitat between the Artic and the tropics. We were really excited and happy to see this one.

OT- My 11th Blogaverisary on WP was Wednesday I’d like to thank everyone who has followed me, left comments, for the conversations, lessons learned, and the friendships I’ve made with quite a few of you over the years. Thank you!🥰

Fuji X-T3| Fuji 100-400mm XF WR OIS lens| PS CC 22.1.0

more to come…

A Little Somethin showy for Saturday

Copyright © 2020 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I didn’t want to go all week without a post so was digging through the years images and found this gem from the Spring.

Isn’t he a showy beauty? It’s a Cinnamon Teal. I rarely see them showing their colors as they’re usually in the water or curled up sleeping.

OT- There’s a Golf Cart lighted parade scheduled tonight in my community and if it’s not raining I plan to be in the driveway photographing it. I’m so glad there’s some normalcy here with lights on the houses and this planned.

What are you doing this week-end? I hope you have a lovely week-end no matter what!

Fuji X-T3| Fuji 100-400mm| PS CC 22.0.1

more to come…

Friday’s Feathered Friends- Blue

Copyright © 2020 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

This week for Lisa’s Bird Weekly Challenge she’s asked us to share Feathers of Blue.  Here are a few I’ve taken so far this year.

Great Blue Heron in Flight-

Great Blue Heron

Western Bluebird-Male

Western Bluebird Male

and a Scrub Jay-

Scrub Jay

I’m off hiking in the high country looking for wildflowers, and butterflies today.  I hope you all have a lovely Friday and week-end! I’ll catch up with you when I get home.

Fuji X-T3| Fujinon 100-400mm| PS CC 21.2

 

To see what other Feathers of Blue people are sharing click here.

bird_weekly_badge_400 web

more to come…

Friday’s Feathered Friends-MT. Chickadee

Copyright ©2020 Deborah M. Zajac.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Two more images from my time with the Chickadees.

Mountain Chickadee

Look at this one taking two seeds at a time! I love it! I didn’t realize it had taken two until I uploaded my images.  Moutain Chickadee

I didn’t crop it in too much so you can see the environment we snowshoed into to see and feed these birds.  It was pretty cool being out here almost alone for a good bit. As the morning wore on though more and more snowshoers started coming up the mountain. We spent an hour and a half feeding the Chickadees then headed down to venture to other places to see what we could find. I’ll share those finds in future posts.

I hope you all have a good week-end!

Fuji X-T3| Fujinon XF 100-400mm  LM OIS| PS CC 21.0.3

more to come…

 

 

 

Friday’s Feathered Friends

Copyright ©2020 Deborah M. Zajac.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Last week was pretty full. I went to see Baby Girl, and the Grandson’s for a couple of days then got home and had friends from out of town over for the week-end.

We went birding. I shared with them the spot where the Chick-a-dees ate from my hand we were fortunate and saw them again and they ate from our hands. It was just as fun, exciting, and awesome as it was the first time.

Two Chick-a-dees landed on my hand to get seeds and one didn’t like the idea of sharing at. all. 😂

Mountain Chickadees

They were quite picky about the sunflowers seeds they would take often spitting several overboard before selecting one and flying off to the trees with it.

In this image, you can see the seed and its shadow in the air in my hand that the Chick-a-dee just discarded. They all did it. Perhaps they were saving some for later?

Chick a Dee feeding from my Hand

My friend Anna was wearing a beanie which was perfect to put some seeds on it and get the Chick-a-dees to land on her cap. They did!

Chickadee on Anna's Hat

This was our first birding stop for the day and it was so much fun.

I’ll share other birds and wild mustangs from the week-end in future posts.

I hope you all are having a great Friday, and your week-end is a good one!

Lumix FZ200| Lexar Digital Film| PS CC 21.0.3

more to come…

 

 

Wordless Wednesday- Chick-a-Dee

Copyright ©2020 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Chick a Dee feeding from my Hand

Me feeding a wild Chick-a-dee!

Lumix FZ200| PS CC 21.0.2

more to come…