Thursday Doors 39/52

Copyright © Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

For this week’s Thursday Doors I have returned to my NYC trip files to share another ancient door panel from the MET (Metropolitan Museum of Art).

The plaque beside the panel says:

Carved Door Panel

Present-day Uzbekistan, Samarquand, Timurid period

(1370-1507), late 15th century

Wood (cypress); carved, with traces of paint

Culture- Islamic

H-82 in (208.3 cm)
W- 30 3/4in (78.1cm)
D-2 1/2in (6.4cm)
Wt. – 127 lbs. (57.6kg)
Made in Present-day Uzbekistan, Samarqand

This door is said to have been found in a secular building in Khokand, in present-day Uzbekistan. The intricate carvings of the interlaced vine scrolls seen here may be compared to similar relief decoration in stone carvings of the fifteenth century and to contemporary manuscript illuminations. The establishment of royal workshops throughout Iran during the fifteenth century fueled a unity of design across media, resulting in the emergence of common regional design vocabularies.

Carved Panel Door

Nikon Df| Nikkor 28-105mm| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2015.5

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links to view all the posts, and add your own if you’re a door enthusiast too.

More to come…

 

 

Lazuli Bunting Watercolor

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Here we are already on July 8th! Which means it’s Draw-a-Bird Day over on CreateArtEveryday, and it’s also #WorldWatercolorMonth created by Charlie O’Shields over at doodlewash.com. 

Yesterday afternoon I felt inspired to paint a Lazuli Bunting I photographed back in May 2014. I used a Pentel Graphic Gear 0.7 to lightly sketch the beak, and snag it’s perched on, but kept the rest the painting loose.  I’m pleasantly surprised how well it came out for not trying to sketch the whole bird.

The Lazuli Bunting is a Spring/Breeding visitor in my region of Northern California.  I was very excited to see it him and add him to my “life list” back in the Spring of 2014.

Lazuli Bunting in Watercolor

The image I used as my reference is here.P52 18 of 52 Lazuli Bunting-1st yr Male

Paint, Paper, Brush:

Sennelier L’Aquarelle in Cinereous Blue, French Vermillion, Bright Red, Burnt Umber, Ivory Black, Naples Yellow Deep, Warm Sepia, Hooker’s green, Phthalo Green Light.

I painted this in my Strathmore Watercolor Art Journal 400 Series 8.5″ X 5.5″ 140lb paper.

Brush:  Di Vinci Artissimo Rd #1

I’m posting this on both Creatarteveryday’s Draw a Bird Day, and #WorldWatercolormonth.  If you have a moment please head over and check out the amazing work being done by artists all over the world.

More to come…

 

What’s blooming?

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Copyright © 2016 Deborah M. Zajac ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

My Agapanthus are blooming right now, and this sweet bud just opening inspired me to try to paint it.

Painted on Arches Hot Press 140lb watercolor paper, with Sennelier paints.
I used, Naples Yellow, Indian Yellow, Cobalt Violet Deep, Ultramarine Deep, Forest Green, Emerald Green, Burnt Umber, Raw Sienna, and Ivory Black.

I received a gift card to Amazon for my birthday last month so, I splurged on a Di Vinci Artissmo brush #1 rd. I used it, along with an Escoda Reserva #2, and a Robert Simmons Sapphire 10/0 brushes.
WOW, does  the Artissmo brush hold water! I’m having to learn to paint all over again with this brush.

 

watercolor

I’m really happy with how this little bud came out. I’m feeling brave enough to try the whole pom pom blossom. To be continued. 🙂

Charlie O’ Shield’s over at doodlewash  has invited artist, and dabblers in paint to tag their  nature paintings, or watercolor  work in the month of June to share our work using the tag

#naturedoodlewash. He’ll compile a list of all those who participated at the end of the month.

Image made with Lumix FZ200| Lexar Professional Digital Film| PS CC 2015

More to come…

Thursday Doors 14/52 Hearst Castle Guest Room

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

At the end of March while down in Morro Bay, CA. He-Man and  I visited Hearst Castle. It had been over 30 yrs since our last visit.  The tours and visitors center have changed since our first visit.

We saw a bit of everything back then, but this time that wasn’t an option so, we chose to the Upstairs Guest Rooms, Hearst’s Bedroom, and Marion Davies Bedroom.

I’ll be sharing more doors and rooms in future posts, but here’s a Guest room door.

It was one of the most decorative and opulent doors I saw while on the tour.

Hearst Castle Guest Bedroom Door

 

 

The entire bedroom was gorgeous; trimmed with gold leaf, and works of art on the walls, and decorating the furniture.

Guest Bedroom Hearst Castle

Mantle in Guest Bedroom Hearst Castle

A view of the castle while riding up the hill to the castle in the transport bus.

Hearst Castle from the Visitors Center

More about Hearst Castle from Wiki-Pedia

Hearst Castle is a National and California Historical Landmark mansion located on the Central Coast of California, United States. It was designed by architect Julia Morgan between 1919 and 1947[3] for newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst, who died in 1951. The California Park Commission voted to approve its inclusion in the California State Park System, which was approved by the California State Legislature in 1954 with a proposed admission charge of $1 per person ($9 adjusted for inflation) and a 50¢ bus ride.[4] However, ironing out the details with the Trustees of the Hearst Estate and the Hearst Corporation took several years. Agreement was finalized in 1957, and it opened in 1958.[5] Since that time it has been maintained within the Hearst San Simeon State Park where the estate, and its considerable collection of art and antiques, is open for public tours. Despite its location far from any urban center, the site attracts “millions of travelers each year”.[6]

This post is part of Norm 2.0’s Thursday Doors.  If you love doors and would like to see the doors others are posting, or post doors you’ve photographed and join other door lovers from around the world click here.

At the end of Norm’s latest Thursday Door post is a little Blue Link-up/View button click it to be taken to a page with all the links, or add your own.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 24-70mm| Delkin Digital Film| Hand-held| PS CC 2015

More to come…

 

Thursday Doors 8/52 Immaculate Conception Catholic Church

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac: ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I’m a bit out of sync with my posts this week since I was hanging with the family, and chasing Horsetail Fall light this past week-end.  I didn’t find any doors to photograph this past week so I’m diving into my archives for Norm’s Thursday Doors this week.

This little church parish of Immaculate Conception is out in the countryside where I go birding quite often. It stands at the end of a small community called Tres Pinos in the township of Hollister, CA.

The Church building was built in 1892 by Father Bernard Smythe across the street from its current location. The land to build the church was purchased for $75.oo.

The Parish was moved to its present location when Hwy 25 was constructed.

The doors are humble…

Immuculate Conception Catholic Church Tres Pinos

the land, garden and sculptures around them are beautiful.

Immaculate Conception CC Side Garden

Winged Victory was constructed in 1945 as a memorial to World War II.

Winged Victory

Sculpture “Father, if it is possible let this cup pass away from me. Not as I will, but as you will” ~Jesus Christ: Matthew 26:39

"Father if it is possible let this cup pass away from me..."

St Benedict- Protect our community…

ST Benedict

The centerpiece of the 14 Stations of the Cross is Michael Angelo’s Pieta. It was sculpted in Carrera, Italy by Enrico Toricelli and donated by Fr. Stuhlmann and his brother in memory of their mother. The base of the sculpture was built by Edward Matthews.

Michael-Angelo’s Pieta by Enrico Toricelli

“The grottoes were designed and built by Edward Matthews in memory of his son, Martin Matthews. The largest grotto is the site of the Nativity, complete with wooden figures and decorated with light.” Immaculateattrespinos.orgGrotto Immaculate Conception CC Tres Pinos

The  Grotto Nativity

Grotto
Grotto detail

Grotto-Three Wise Men

Grotto

Grotto-The Shepard’s and animals in the manger

Grotto

I didn’t get to go inside to photograph the chapel, but I hope to one day.

This is part of Norm 2.0 Thursday Doors. To see all the doors posted this week click here click on the little blue sync up button at the bottom of his page where you’ll be directed to links to all those participating.

For more information about the Parish click here.

 

More to come…

Vermilion Flycatcher Male-In Watercolor + 1

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

It was rainy last week which kept #1 Grandson and myself indoors. Some of the things I’m trying to teach him are coloring, writing, and painting.  One rainy morning I set up his paints, paper, brushes, water bowl, and crayons. While he was giving his crayons a bath, and finger painting I reached for a piece of his Artist Loft watercolor paper then using my brushes dipped into his Artist Loft’s watercolor palette to paint a loose rendition of the Vermilion Flycatcher I had photographed the previous week-end.

Vermilion Flycatcher in Watercolor

 

A few days later I tried to paint it with a bit more structure and detail using my Turner Watercolor paints, and Arches 140lb cold pressed watercolor paper.

Vermilion Flycatcher Male in Watercolor

I like the loose painting best even though the pigment isn’t as rich and the paper hasn’t much tooth.

The Reference Photo-

Vermilion Flycatcher-Male

The following evening instead of watching TV or reading I went in a different direction and painted Poppies.

Poppies in Watercolor

I used my Turner Watercolor Paints, and Arches Watercolor 140lb cold pressed paper for

this painting.  I’ve been doing poppies on and off for a few months and I like this one the best so far.  I have a LONG way to go before I’m anything other than mediocre as a painter, but I’m having fun learning and trying.

Panasonic Lumix FZ200| Lexar Professional Digital Film| PS CC 2015|

More to come…