“Dwell on the beauty of life. Watch the stars, and see yourself running with them.” ― Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

While watching the night sky for Perseid Meteors Friday night I shot just under 300 frames. In all those frames I only managed to photograph 3 meteors! The rest that I saw were over my head or just out of the frame.

What to do with all those frames of stars? Stack them to make a Star Trail image is one thing.

Passing car headlights, other star gazers using their flashlights, and headlamps…maybe my own red headlamp too unintentionally light painted the trees, and foreground bushes for me.

Star Trails with Perseid Meteor

If I get a chance to photograph the Perseids or any other meteor showers this year or next I’ll use my 16mm Fisheye lens to get more sky in my frame.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G| composite of 24 frames @ f/2.8| 26seconds ea| ISO 1600| Delkin Digital Film| PS CC 2015.5

more to come…

 

2016 Perseids

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I went out Friday night/Saturday morning star gazing hoping to photograph a meteor or two of the Perseid meteor shower.  The Perseid Meteor shower is an annual event occurring from mid July to mid August as the Earth crosses the orbital path of Comet Swift-Tuttle; the parent of the Perseid meteor shower.  Debris from the comet litters its orbital path, but we don’t get into the dense part of it until the first week of August.  It’s this debris that slams into Earth’s upper atmosphere at 130,000 mile per hour lighting up the night sky with streaking Perseid meteors.

This year was to be particularly good for viewing more meteors because of our position in the debris path.

I saw a few really great meteors with wonderful balls of fire streaking through the sky, but the best image I made in 4 hours of sky watching was of this little meteor with some red at the head and a green tail.  It’s a first time I’ve photographed the green tail.

Perseid Meteor 2016

 

 

There’s some of the Milky Way in there too, but faint, but there were oh, so many stars!

It was a wonderful night for star gazing.

Nikon Df| Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G @ f/2.8| ISO 1600| 26s  single frame| Delkin Digital Film|PS CC 2015.5

Source-Earthsky.org

more to come…

 

 

 

 

 

P52 40/52 Blood Moon Total Lunar Eclipse

Copyright ©2015 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

The Blood Moon at Maximum Eclipse over the Wreck of Point Reyes, Inverness, CA. USA.

Blood Moon Total Lunar Eclipse

Single Exposure slightly cropped| Nikon Df| AF-S Nikkor 20mm f/1.8G| Hoodman STEEL Ultra High Speed Digital Film| Tripod| CS6

More to come…

Milky Way over Mt. Shasta CA

Copyright ©2015 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

A couple of weeks back some friends and I spent the week-end near Mt. Shasta hoping for a clear night for night imaging the Milky Way. We’d been skunked the week-end before in Lassen National Park, and the smoke from the fires burning in Northern CA was causing a haze in the atmosphere.

The clouds began to shift about Sunset. There were some low clouds around the peak of Mt. Shasta, but the peak itself was clear. We hoped that held up, and it did! I caught a Shooting Star too! I don’t think this is a Perseid Meteor, but I could be wrong. Though the timing for the Perseid’s was right when I made this image.

Milky Way over Mount Shasta CA, USA

The lights are from surrounding towns and way out in the distance might be Redding, CA.

Nikon Df| AF-S Nikkor 17-35mm| Hoodman STEEL Ultra High Speed Digital Film| CS6

More to come…

“Did you finally get the chance to dance along the light of day ,and head back to the Milky Way?”Train – Drops Of Jupiter

Copyright © Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

"Did you finally get the chance to dance along the light of dayAnother image from my week-end with friends camping in the Stanislaus National Forest in North Eastern California. We had great weather, and two nights of gorgeous dark skies.

Here in the Northern Hemisphere the constellation Sagittarius rises in the southern sky bringing with it a very dense part of the Milky Way: a large plume of white milky gas, and dust, and running through it a dark lane called the Great Rift with all its tributaries standing out marvelously in the night sky.

We scouted for locations during the afternoon and found this location off trail. We hiked through a hillside full of mesquite, and low bushes keeping an eye and ear out for Rattlesnakes then we climbed on top of a huge granite slab to get a higher perspective.
It was wonderful to be under such a dark sky and see so many stars, the Milky Way, and a few shooting stars, and it was really great having Marsha for company. It had been a long time since we’d been out shooting the stars together.
We’re making plans to return to this area for more night imaging.
You can see Marsha’s work here.

Nikon D700| AF-S 17-35mm @17mm| f2.8| 20 seconds| ISO 3200| Manual Priority| Tripod