Friday’s Feathered Friends- Woodpeckers

Copyright ©2020 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

This week for Lisa’s Bird Weekly Challenge  is Woodpeckers, Sapsuckers, and/or Flickers

I’ve been saving that White-headed Woodpecker I told you about back in May. This Woodpecker is a “lifer” for me or was back in April when I quickly saw it but didn’t get a good image of one until May.  This is the Male. You can tell by the red patch on the back of its head.  I’m right on the edge of their “year-round” range so with any luck I’ll see one again.

White-headed Woodpecker Male
Copyright © 2020 Deborah M. Zajac ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

 

He-Man and I went down to Baby Girls on Wednesday and spent the night and yesterday when we came home we brought #1 Grandson home with us. It’s so nice having him here for a visit.  The boys across the street were so excited to see him and him them. They ask about him all the time and once in a while if the timing is right they talk via FaceTime. They spent the whole evening outside playing and riding their scooters enjoying the perfect summer evening weather.

This week-end we’ve got plans to see his other set of Grandparents, and his Aunt, Uncle, and cousins who live here. They’re excited to see each other and play together too. We’re having a picnic today. Although I’m not sure how long we’ll last outside. It’s supposed to be 93°  today.

I’ll be catching with your blogs soon!

I hope you all have a great week-end and if you’ve got time and interest head on over to Lisa’s Bird Weekly page to see what kinds of woodpeckers, sapsuckers, and flickers others have seen and shared.

Fuji X-T3| Fuji 100-400mm lens| PS CC 21.2

more to come…

 

Wordless Wednesday- House Finch

Copyright © 2020 Deborah M. Zajac.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

House Finch

Fuji X-T3| Fujinon XF100-400mm LM OIS at 400mm| 3/17/2020| SanDisk Digital Film

more to come…

Friday Most Fowl- Great Horned Owl Pair

Copyright © 2019 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

This pair is living in a barn on a ranch not too far from me. The owners were kind enough to let me and a birding friend wander around for a bit.

Great-horned Owl Pair

These two were a real treat to see.

Nikon D810| Nikkor 200-500mm| Hoodman Digital Film| PS CC 20.0.6

more to come…

Whatever Weds. This and That

Copyright © 2019 Deborah M. Zajac.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I thought I’d share several images I’ve made in the last few weeks and have been working on to share.

Golden Hour over the 13th Fairway, the Eastern Sierras, and the marsh as seen looking southwest from my patio.

Golden Hour on the Eastern Sierras and Neighborhood

A new bird for me! A Rough-winged Swallow with lunch.  If I have not made the correct ID for this one please let me know!

Roughed-winged Swallow with Lunch

Last Friday a friend came up for a Doctor’s appointment and spent the night, but after her appointment, we went out exploring my area looking for some Nevada Wild Mustangs; we had Lady Luck with us b/c we found a small band!  Doing a little research we discovered that this  Black/Blue Stallion is called Zorro.

Zorro

Here’s one of Zorro’s band members with some Hitchhikers.

Wild Mustang with Birds out for a ride

I’m looking forward to getting to know the Wild Mustangs of Nevada and this band.

To close out this week’s post I’ll share a sunset from last week. This was made while I was on my patio.

Sunset from my Patio

 

I hope you’re all having a great week so far, and as they say out here in the Valley, let’s get our Hump Day Dance on and bump those hips! 😂

Nikon D810| Nikkor 200-500mm and Nikkor 50mm| Lexar and Hoodman Digital Film| PS CC 2019

more to come…

Whatever Weds. Great-tailed Grackle

Copyright ©2019 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

This bird was on the back fence competing for food with the Yellow-headed Blackbirds making rather lewd calls to scare them off.

He looks a bit grumpy, doesn’t he?

Blackbird

Since we’ve been pretty well settled in we’ve been having family and friends come to visit which is why I’ve been less active on the blog lately.

Baby Girl, the Handsome Surveyor, and the boys came for Mother’s Day and my Birthday, then a good friend stopped by for the night while traveling, and we’ve had Big Baby Boy home for 5 days. Sadly, he’s heading back to SOCAL today.

Both the kids said, “it feels like home!” at the new house and are happy, and like it here too.

The weather has been a bit gloomy lately and driving home from Baby Girl’s Sunday we had snow in the mountains. It was a gorgeous winter wonderland with the tall pines flocked in snow.

On the homefront- I’m still waiting for the countertop for the base laundry room cabinets to come in. The pantry cabinet I ordered arrived damaged and went back, and a wall cabinet got smashed in transit and I’m waiting for that replacement.

The closet shelving in the office and retreat are complete, and He-Man’s Master Closet is finished. He wasted no time filling it up!

The house in Silicon Valley went on the market Friday.  Here’s hoping for a sale soon!

I hope you all are having a good week!

Nikon D810| Nikkor 200-500mm| Hoodman Digital Film| PS CC 2019 & iPhone 7 Plus

more to come…

 

 

 

 

Wild Weds. 49/52 Song Sparrow

Copyright ©2018 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Song Sparrow…I think. Its song was pretty on this morning in June.

Sing a Song!

 

Nikon D810| Nikkor 200-500mm| PS CC 2019

more to come…

Wild Wednesday 33/52 Snowy Plovers

Copyright © 2018 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

While at the beach a couple weeks ago to photograph the Moon we came across a protected area where we discovered Snowy Plovers nesting.

They’re a small shorebird found on beaches, and barren ground all across North American Gulf and Pacific coasts and here and there in California, Texas, and Saskatchewan inland areas. They are also found in South America, and Eurasia.

Snowy Plover

Neat facts from allaboutbirds.org:

The Snowy Plover will many time raise two broods a year, and sometimes three in places where the breeding season is long.  The female deserts her mate and brood about the time the chicks hatch and initiates a new breeding with a different male.

Snowy Plover in Nest

Young Snowy Plovers leave their nest within three hours of hatching! They flatten themselves on the ground when a parent signal the approach of people or possible predators.  They walk, run, and swim well and forage unaided by parents, but need periodic brooding for many days after hatching.

The oldest recorded Snowy Plover was at least 15 years, 2 months old when it was spotted in the wild in California and identified by its band. ~allaboutbirds.org

This one was really close to the edge of the protected nesting area which was great. It gave us really great looks, and photo ops.

Snowy Plover

Sadly, the Snowy Plover population is listed as Near Threatened as their numbers are in decline.  It’s believed their habitat is in decline due to habitat alteration, and increased recreational use of beaches.

I was happy to see this section roped/taped off, and no one breached the barrier while I was there so, it looks like people are respecting them, and the rules to stay out of the area while they’re nesting. I hope that bodes well for a successful breeding season for these cute little shorebirds.

I hope your week is going well, and you all have a lovely week-end!

Nikon D810| Nikkor 200-500mm @500mm| Lexar Digital Film| PS CC 2018

more to come…