Golden Gate Bridge after Dark from Battery Spenser

Copyright ©2015 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Golden Gate Bridge after Dark from Battery SpenserThis is the view from Battery Spenser in the Marin Headlands looking south at the Golden Gate Bridge and San Francisco’s skyline sparkling like jewels in the night.

Nikon Df| AF-D Nikkor 28-1-5mm Micro lens| Tripod| Hoodman STEEL Ultra High Speed Digital Film

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MM2:5 Watching the Total Lunar Eclipse over St. Ignatius Cathedral San Francisco, CA

Copyright ©2015 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

MM2-5 Watching the Total Lunar Eclipse over St. Ignatius Cathedr

For this week’s Monochrome Madness 2:5 I thought I’d share one of the stills from the Total Lunar Eclipse on April 4, 2015.  This was taken shortly after the Partial Phase got started. The Moon is a bit blown out here, but my plan of operation was to stick to one lens, and the same camera settings all through the Eclipse then stack the images in post development. The Moon in the beginning would be blown out I knew, but later in the darker phase of the Eclipse the exposure would be correct.

To see what other photographer’s who are participating in Leanne Cole’s Monochrome Madness 2  weekly challenge have posted this week click here.

Nikon Df| AF-S Nikkor 17-35mm f2.8 @f8| 10 seconds| ISO 400

More to come…

5-Day Black and White Photography Challenge

Copyright © 2014 Deborah M. Zajac. All Rights Reserved.

A friend of mine Alex Baranda  challenged me to a 5-Day Black and White Photography challenge. I’ll be posting a black and white image each day for 5 days, and I’m supposed to challenge another photographer to do the same. Right now I’m thinking I’ll skip that part and just work on the challenge. For me it’s outside my box. I rarely process images in Black & White. I love color, and I haven’t found a recipe that says, ” That’s Deborah Zajac’s work.” yet.

I’m excited about this challenge. Hopefully I’ll grow as a photographer and learn something new too.

Thanks Alex for the push!

Here’s my image for Day 1- This is from my archives. The Legion of Honor in San Francisco, CA. Taken in July 2011.

Nikon D300s| AF-S Nikkor 17-35mm f/2.8| Tripod | Developed in CS 6

History of the Palace of the Legion of Honor is here.

More to come…

The Legion of Honor San Francisco CA

Feeling Blue

Copyright © 2011 Deborah M. Zajac.  All Rights Reserved.

Sundial Bridge, Redding,California

The first time I photographed this bridge at night was in 2009, but I only had my monopod with me at the time so, the image wasn’t as good as I wanted it to be. I’ve wanted to get up here to do another Night image since then. I love this period of Twilight and am so happy to have had another opportunity to photograph this bridge in this special time of day.

Nikon D300s| Nikkor 17-35mm @ 17mm| f8| 4.0 sec.| ISO 200| Manual Mode| Tripod|Remote Release Cable

For the Historians:

The Sundial Bridge at Turtle Bay crosses the Sacramento River in the heart of Redding, California. Opened July 4, 2004, the bridge links the north and south campuses of Turtle Bay Exploration Park and serves as a new downtown entrance for Redding’s extensive Sacramento River Trail system.

The bridge celebrates human creativity and ingenuity, important themes of the 300 acre Turtle Bay Exploration Park. The steel, glass, and granite span evokes a sense of weightlessness and the translucent, non-skid decking provides for spectacular viewing at night. The bridge is also environmentally sensitive to its river setting. The tall pylon and cable stays allow the bridge to avoid the nearby salmon-spawning habitat there are no supports in the water while encouraging public appreciation for the river. Plazas are situated at both ends of the bridge for public use; the north-side plaza stretches to the water allowing patrons to sit at the river’s edge.

In addition to being a functional work of art, the Sundial Bridge is a technical marvel as well. The cable-stayed structure has an inclined, 217 foot pylon constructed of 580 tons of steel. The deck is made up of 200 tons of glass and granite and is supported by more than 4,300 feet of cable. The structure is stabilized by a steel truss, and rests on a foundation of more than 115 tons of steel and 1,900 cubic yards of concrete. The McConnell Foundation, a private, independent foundation established in Redding in 1964, funded the majority of the bridge’s $23 million cost.

World renowned Spanish architect and engineer Santiago Calatrava conceived the Sundial Bridge’s unusual design, his first free-standing bridge in the United States. Calatrava has built bridges, airports, rail terminals, stadiums, and other structures around the world. His notable designs include the new PATH transportation terminal at the World Trade Center site in New York City and several projects at the 2004 Olympic Games in Athens, Greece, including the main stadium where opening and closing ceremonies were held.

~Turtle Bay Exploration Park

More to come…