The Sun and Sunspot AR2665

Copyright ©2017 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I read at Spaceweather.com over the week-end that the latest sunspot AR2665 was HUGE, and the biggest sunspot of 2017 so, not having photographed the Sun for sometime I thought it would be interesting to make an image of this Sunspot on the Sun.  I dug out my solar filter then Monday morning set up my camera in the backyard and waited for the morning sun to climb above the mountain tops.   I cropped this image in 25% so we can see the spot a bit better.

Sun July 10, 2017 with Sunspot AR2665

“Sunspot AR2665 has grown into a behemoth almost as wide as the planet Jupiter: Stretching more than 125,000 km from end to end and containing dozens of dark cores, the active region is an now easy target for backyard solar telescopes. Sunspot AR2665 has a ‘beta-gamma’ magnetic field that harbors energy for M-class solar flares.. “~http://spaceweather.com/

I’ll add you can see it with a Telephoto lens, and Solar filter.  Caveat: Don’t ever attempt to photograph the sun without a Solar Filter. You can permanently damage your eyes, and your camera’s sensor.

M-Class Solar Flares are Medium sized flares. They can cause brief radio blackouts that affect Earth’s polar regions.

I use an Orion 4.10″ ID Full Aperture Solar Filter. It fits snugly over my lens allowing me to look directly at the sun and photograph it by blocking  99.999% of incoming sunlight for safe observation and astrophotography.  I’ve had this filter for several years and it’s worked perfectly, and is easy to use.  It fits my 300mm f/4 perfectly. It slides over my 200-500mm’s 82mm front end element, but not so far that I’m able to secure it with the screws so, to make sure it wouldn’t fall off I taped it to my lens barrel.  Gaffers tape or Painters tape works.

I linked to the filter so you can check it out if you’re interested. I am not affiliated with Orion and do not receive any compensation or products for using their products or mentioning them.  

Nikon Df| Nikkor 200-500mm @500mm| SanDisk Digital Film| PS CC 2017

more to come…

 

 

 

January Morning Sun

Copyright © 2015 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

My first Sun image of the year!

There’s a large active sunspot AR2253 in the center of the sun. NOAA says there’s a 50% chance of M-Class Flare today Jan. 5, 2015 from this Sunspot region.

Solar flares are classified by their x-ray brightness in wavelength range 1-8 Angstroms.
” There are 3 categories: X-Class flares are big; these can trigger radio blackouts around the planet and long lasting radiation storms. M-Class flares are medium sized; they can cause brief radio blackouts that effect Earth’s Polar regions. Minor radiation storms sometimes follow M-Class flares. Compared to X-Class and M-Class Flare events, C-Class flares are small with few noticeable consequences here on Earth.”~ Spaceweater.com

January Morning Sun

Nikon D700| AF-S Nikkor 300mm f/4| AF-S Nikkor 14eII TC| Orion Solar Filter|Tripod

More to come…

May 12, 2012 Sun

May 12, 2012 Sun, originally uploaded by dmzajac2004-.

Via Flickr:
Copyright © 2011 Deborah M. Zajac. All Rights Reserved

I haven’t had as much time as I’ve wanted to practice using my Solar filter and I haven’t tried a time-lapse with it yet either. Too many gray days, and other
distractions have been in the way.
The Solar Eclipse is this week! I hope to get more practice before Sunday’s event.

Yes, even though I left home without my Teleconverter I did get the sunspots.

I’m using this Solar filter:

http://www.telescope.com/410-ID-Orion-Full-Aperture-Solar-Filter/p/7733.uts?keyword=solar%20filter

Don’t try to capture the Eclipse without using proper protection for both your eyes and camera! Get a filter made especially to view the Sun! Time may be running out for you pick up a filter I recommend calling around and if you find one jump on it. I bought one that fits the end of my lens hood.

Nikon D700| Nikkor 80-200mm @ 200mm|
Costa Mesa, California, Afternoon, Sunspots, AstroPhotography