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Copyright ©2017 Deborah M. Zajac.  ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

The Great Eclipse of August 2017 was 75% eclipsed where I live in the San Francisco Bay Area.

I wasn’t able to travel to see Totality so photographed the Eclipse from my backyard.

I made an image every 10 minutes from just before it began until the very end. The images are unguided. In between images I moved my lens away from the sun so the sun wouldn’t be shining down my lens and possibly damage my sensor even though I had a genuine Solar Filter mounted to the lens.

This composite showing some of the most pronounced phases of the phenomenon is comprised of 7 frames. The left side is first contact, the middle peak eclipsed, and the last image on the right last contact or pretty close to it.

Partial Solar Eclipse August 21, 2017

Nikon D810| Nikkor 200-500mm @500mm| f/11| ISO 200| 1/500s – 1/320s| PS CC 2017

I’ve got my mind set on seeing the Solar Eclipse in 2024 in Totality, and will be making plans to view that early as that probably will be the last chance I get to see it live.

more to come…

 

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Copyright ©2017 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

I read at Spaceweather.com over the week-end that the latest sunspot AR2665 was HUGE, and the biggest sunspot of 2017 so, not having photographed the Sun for sometime I thought it would be interesting to make an image of this Sunspot on the Sun.  I dug out my solar filter then Monday morning set up my camera in the backyard and waited for the morning sun to climb above the mountain tops.   I cropped this image in 25% so we can see the spot a bit better.

Sun July 10, 2017 with Sunspot AR2665

“Sunspot AR2665 has grown into a behemoth almost as wide as the planet Jupiter: Stretching more than 125,000 km from end to end and containing dozens of dark cores, the active region is an now easy target for backyard solar telescopes. Sunspot AR2665 has a ‘beta-gamma’ magnetic field that harbors energy for M-class solar flares.. “~http://spaceweather.com/

I’ll add you can see it with a Telephoto lens, and Solar filter.  Caveat: Don’t ever attempt to photograph the sun without a Solar Filter. You can permanently damage your eyes, and your camera’s sensor.

M-Class Solar Flares are Medium sized flares. They can cause brief radio blackouts that affect Earth’s polar regions.

I use an Orion 4.10″ ID Full Aperture Solar Filter. It fits snugly over my lens allowing me to look directly at the sun and photograph it by blocking  99.999% of incoming sunlight for safe observation and astrophotography.  I’ve had this filter for several years and it’s worked perfectly, and is easy to use.  It fits my 300mm f/4 perfectly. It slides over my 200-500mm’s 82mm front end element, but not so far that I’m able to secure it with the screws so, to make sure it wouldn’t fall off I taped it to my lens barrel.  Gaffers tape or Painters tape works.

I linked to the filter so you can check it out if you’re interested. I am not affiliated with Orion and do not receive any compensation or products for using their products or mentioning them.  

Nikon Df| Nikkor 200-500mm @500mm| SanDisk Digital Film| PS CC 2017

more to come…

 

 

 

Copyright © 2015 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

My first Sun image of the year!

There’s a large active sunspot AR2253 in the center of the sun. NOAA says there’s a 50% chance of M-Class Flare today Jan. 5, 2015 from this Sunspot region.

Solar flares are classified by their x-ray brightness in wavelength range 1-8 Angstroms.
” There are 3 categories: X-Class flares are big; these can trigger radio blackouts around the planet and long lasting radiation storms. M-Class flares are medium sized; they can cause brief radio blackouts that effect Earth’s Polar regions. Minor radiation storms sometimes follow M-Class flares. Compared to X-Class and M-Class Flare events, C-Class flares are small with few noticeable consequences here on Earth.”~ Spaceweater.com

January Morning Sun

Nikon D700| AF-S Nikkor 300mm f/4| AF-S Nikkor 14eII TC| Orion Solar Filter|Tripod

More to come…

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