Thurs. Doors-The Brown Building

Copyright ©2021 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Last week while birding we made a stop in Maxwell, CA. to try to find a rare bird that has been making his home in Maxwell for nearly 5 winters now. I shared that beautiful bird the Vermillion Flycatcher in this post back in 2016.

We found him again and I will be sharing his picture in a future post, but since this is a post about doors let’s get to the door. On the way out of town I stopped to make an image of this door and building. I loved the turquoise door, and the Mission yet maybe art deco style of the building.

The Header on top of the building says, GB-Brown 1910. Maxwell, CA.

I got a bonus door in the back right with that garage door too. 😀

I began searching for any information about the building online, but I came up empty so I reached out to the Colusa County Chamber of Commerce to see if they knew anything about the building GB-Brown or Brown the person. They kindly forwarded my email to John Morton a Colusa County Historical Researcher. He got back to me really quick and asked for a photo of the building which I sent him. It wasn’t long before he replied with this information about the building,

The building was built in 1910 and used very little as a horse stable before being converted to a car garage owned by George Blench Brown,  B – August 6, 1869  Missouri & D – August 18, 1941 in Colusa County, Ca. He is buried in the Maxwell Cemetery. The Maxwell Fire Department named their station for Marion James Brown, late Fire Chief for the station for many years. He is also the son of George B. Brown. 
I don’t know the current owner of the building, you will have to go to the Assessor’s Office, give them the address and they will help you. Your right, it’s not a Historical Building. There are three plaques on three different buildings in Maxwell. Maxwell is a town, no city council, no police dept, patrolled by the county sheriff. In fact, the founder of the town, George Maxwell is buried in the Colusa Community Cemetery, so when he passed away, there was no cemetery in Maxwell.
That’s all the information I have on the building.
“~ John Morton

I have shared other doors in Maxwell, here , this cute cottage door, this nice blue door. I thought there was one more…I guess it’s in my archive marinating still. But, in addition to the great information about the building, John gave me three historical landmarks to seek out for more doors in Maxwell! Thank you so much, John Morton!

Thursday Doors is the creation of Norm 2.0. However, it is now hosted at Dan Antion’s blog No Facilities. Click here to get to his blog to see many other doors from all over the world that other door lovers have shared this week.

iPhone 7Plus| PS CC 22.1.0

more to come…

Author: circadianreflections

My name is Deborah Zajac. I'm a photographer living in Nevada at the base of the Eastern Sierras. I am a passionate nature, landscape, night/astro photographer. I shoot predominately in color and use Nikon Digital Cameras, and lenses. I hope you enjoy seeing some of the photos I've taken while on my travels. Please feel free to leave a comment I'd love to hear from you.

50 thoughts on “Thurs. Doors-The Brown Building”

  1. how fun to learn about the history of the building with that reaching out!
    and it looks too njce to be a stable or a garage but hey- the style was the thing
    and when i first saw it from the first look – i thought art deco right away but now i also see “mission”
    either way – enjoyed the doors and history

    oh and the link to the 2016 post did not work for me – but it might be my mobile settings – but wanted to mention it
    have a good day
    for me

  2. It’s a pity that obviously, this building is quite run down. It has lost its former glory – but we can still imagine it.
    Keep healthy and happy
    The Fab Four of Cley
    🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

  3. A unique and fascinating photo, Deborah. Isn’t it a real treat when you connect with a real human being, such as your email story? Interesting information.🙂

    1. It was great getting some of the history about the building from John. It brought the building to life a little bit. Plus I sort of met John and when I return perhaps we’ll collaborate on another building’s history. That would be cool.

      Thanks so much for the lovely comment, Erica! I hope you have a great week. 😀

  4. I love the Spanish look to the top of the building and the color of the doors is great. How nice of this man to respond so quickly and be so helpful. These days more than ever that kind of help is to be treasured. A vermillion flycatcher, eh? I have to admit I was thrilled to get photos of one near Tucson last year, so I know how you feel.

    janet

    1. Thank you so much, Janet! Yes, it was quite wonderful that John replied and that Chamber forwarded my email at all was quite amazing.

      John tried to leave a comment, but it didn’t stick, but he says he’s thrilled we all like the door/building and history! He hopes our paths cross again via a door or building in his area. 😀 I think they will since I bird over there at least once a year.

      The VF…it’s such a beautiful bird! The birds with any red we have out here are the Finches, and the Tanager in the Spring. Seeing the exotic VF was a highlight for me, and makes waiting to see a Cardinal in the wild a little more tolerable. 😀

  5. It is easy to see why you found this building attractive, Sharon. The lines are so beautiful, espec. on the top, and nice in the photo that you have the blue sky behind it, highlighting the line. And how great that you were able to connect with the historian and he was so thorough with his response.

  6. What an ornate frame for a garage, Deborah. Or, was it formerly a house? What an idea to go to the Assessor’s office to find out the history! Any way, an interesting find:)
    About your comment about the snow: yes, I got my wish! Especially because neighbors told me that snow almost never appears here.

  7. That’s a great door, but an even better story about John Morton. How nice of him to respond so quickly. Now you have a door, a bird (I can’t wait to see that) and a reason to go back to Maxwell for another history lessons. I love learning the stories behind the buildings we normally pass and take for granted. More important, John’s willingness to help you in this little quest bolsters my optimism about the true nature of people.

    Thanks for a uniquely uplifting post, Deborah.

    1. Thank you so much, Dan! It was pretty great that the Chamber of Commerce in Colusa forwarded my email and neither they or John thought I was too kooky and responded. It certainly makes the image more interesting having some background information. 😀

    1. Thank you so much, Suzanne! It’s a pretty cool building and I love the door color and texture.

      I am thrilled that John was able to help with some history of the building too. It’s pretty great.

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