Torch Lily

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Torch Lily has several common names- Red Hot Poker,  and Tritoma, but its real name is Kniphofia uvaria.  It gets it’s name Red Hot Poker from the shape of the blossom, and Torch Lily from the blossom, and the shape of its leaves which are similar to the Lily.  They get to be quite tall, and can bloom at different times of the growing season. I made this image in the Spring while out birding.

It’s looks amazing against a green or dark background.

Flower Photography

It’s a non-native plant to California. It originated in Cape Provence of South Africa, but it isn’t uncommon here.

When reading about this plant I discovered it’s become invasive in south-eastern Australia and they consider it an environmental weed.  I guess it spreads easily damaging native and sensitive ecosystems.  It may come to that here too, but it’s pretty, and a show stopper.

Nikon D700| Nikkor 200-500mm| Hoodman Digital Film| PS CC 2015.5

Heads Up– Adobe PS CC had a Bridge, and Adobe Camera Raw Update today.  If you have PS CC just open your  cloud thingy and Bob’s your Uncle!  I will say since moving to the subscription service Updates are easy.

More to come…

 

An Australian Beauty

Copyright ©2016 Deborah M. Zajac. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

UPDATE: Pauline over at https://pommepal.wordpress.com/  has identified this plant! It is called Waratah, and is in the Proteaceae family.  Thank you so much Pauline!

The Wintering birds are beginning to head north which means they’ll be fewer bird posts, but I won’t be slowing down. Spring is blooming all over and I love hunting for flowers and photographing them.

Protea

This particular plant and blossom is a Native of Australia.  Much to my surprise I learned last year that Santa Cruz has the same Mediterranean climate as Australia. The University of California in Santa Cruz has a lovely Arboretum with quite a few native Australian plants and flowers of which this is one.  The Elevenia J. Slosson Research Garden established in 1978  began looking for drought, and pest tolerant beautiful ornamentals to give Californians some options for our gardens.  Since their trials they’ve paved the way with Koala Blooms Programs to introduce many new plants to California gardeners.

I think this is in the Protea Family. I couldn’t find the marker to snap an image so I’d have the name of it. If anyone knows what it’s called please let me know.

Nikon D700| Nikkor 105mm macro lens| Lexar Professional Digital Film| PS CC 2015| Nik Suite| On 1 Photo 10

More to come…